14 Days of jQuery Summary: Days 8-14, jQuery 1.4.1 Released

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In case you’re not following along with the 14 days of jQuery, here’s a summary of what has been released for days 8-14.

Highlights

On Day 12, the jQuery team released jQuery 1.4.1, the first bug release to jQuery 1.4. jQuery 1.4.1 is now the latest release of jQuery; take a moment to review the 1.4.1 release notes.

On Day 13, the team announced the new jQuery Meetups site. We want to help foster local meetups and eventually try to provide more resources to your groups.

jQuery Meetups

On Day 14, the jQuery UI team released jQuery UI 1.8 Release Candidate 1. The team would love you to test and provide feedback with bugs or comments in the jQuery UI Development forum.

Full Recap

Day 8

  • The jQuery Project
  • jQuery.org

Day 9

  • jQuery Workshop Giveaway
  • jQuery Podcast Episode 8: api.jquery.com
  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #3, with Paul Irish
  • jQuery API Key Navigation

Day 10

  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #4, with Paul Irish

Day 11

  • Evented Programming with jQuery, Yehuda Katz
  • Behind the 14 Days of jQuery

Day 12

  • jQuery 1.4.1 Released
  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #5, with Paul Irish

Day 13

  • jQuery Meetups
  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #6, with Paul Irish
  • Paul Irish and Dave Methvin Join the jQuery Team

Day 14

  • jQuery UI 1.8rc1

Sponsors and Donations

Again, events like these are not possible without support from our great sponsors and from you, the jQuery Community. We’d like to thank everyone who has donated during this campaign. We received donations from 653 people, and we are truly grateful to all who contributed. If you missed the campaign, you can still let us know how much jQuery makes your life easier by sending a tax-deductible donation or by showing our sponsors some love for their support.

Netflix

Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) is the world’s largest online movie rental service, with more than 11 million subscribers. For only $8.99 a month, Netflix members can instantly watch unlimited movies and TV episodes streamed to their TVs and computers and can receive unlimited DVDs delivered quickly to their homes.

JupiterIT

Jupiter provides expert web application development, support services, and training. Committed to open source, Jupiter collected its global experience delivering enterprise JavaScript applications and made it publically available as JavaScriptMVC.

appendTo

appendTo, the jQuery company, delivers industry-leading jQuery training and support services to the web development community and corporations worldwide. Leveraging the power of the Write Less, Do More JavaScript library and the vast experience of jQuery Team Members, appendTo is at the forefront of propelling the jQuery movement into the next generation of open source technology advancements

Oxide Design

Oxide Design Co. is a communications and information design firm. We specialize in corporate identity, brand strategy, packaging, print, and web site design. We clarify ideas to create effective design.

Fusionary

We are Fusionary, an award-winning web and interactive studio. We’ve been creating things online since 1995 and our clients love us.

The team hopes you enjoyed this online conference celebrating the 1.4 release of jQuery. We would love to hear your feedback. Please submit your feedback in this thread on the new jQuery Forum.

14 Days of jQuery Summary: Days 1 – 7

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In case you’re not following along with the 14 days of jQuery, here’s a summary of what has been released thus far.

Pre Release Day 1

  • New jQuery API Site

Pre Release Day 2

  • jQuery 1.4rc1

Day 1

  • jQuery 1.4 Released
  • jQuery 1.4 Live Q&A

Day 2

  • HD version of jQuery 1.4 Q&A
  • Media Temple Giveaway
  • jQuery Podcast episode 7 with John Resig

Day 3

  • Internal Changes in jQuery 1.4, with John Resig

Day 4

  • Getting Involved in the jQuery Community, with Karl Swedberg

Day 5

  • appendTo Training Drawing
  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #1, with Paul Irish

Day 6

  • jQuery In The Enterprise

Day 7

  • New jQuery Forum
  • jQuery 1.4 Hawtness #2, with Paul Irish

We still have 7 more days of jQuery 1.4 to come with more video’s and more releases to announce.

Again, events like these are not possible without support from our great sponsors and from you, the jQuery Community. We’d like to thank everyone who has donated so far, and we’d like to remind everyone that you will receive a free ebook with the donation of $20 or more throughout the 14 Days of jQuery.

Media Template Giveaway

Each day during the 14 days of jQuery, a web developer will receive a free (gs) Grid-Service account for one year from the jQuery Project’s web hosting provider, Media Temple. A grand prize winner will receive a 13″ MacBook Pro!

In order to enter the contest, you must submit a link to your coolest use of jQuery. A winner will be chosen each day during the 14 Days of jQuery. The grand prize winner will be announced on Friday, January 29th.

Check the Media Template Giveaway webpage for more details about the contest and to see the announced daily winners. There are only 7 days left, so enter now!

Check out jQuery Enlightenment!

jQuery EnlightenmentjQuery team member Cody Lindley has published the jQuery Enlightenment book, and if you haven’t checked it out yet, you’ll definitely want to. “Each chapter contains concepts essential to becoming a seasoned jQuery developer,”‘” so even if you’ve already got your copy, pick one up for a friend who’s just learning! Even better, a percentage of all sales goes directly back to the jQuery project and helps fund future releases and projects. A big thank you to Cody for his generous donation for the 14 Days of jQuery campaign!

14 Days of jQuery and the New API Browser

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It’s the start of a new year, and the jQuery team’s been hard at work. We’ve been up day and night working to crank out the upcoming jQuery 1.4 release, and there’s a LOT to announce! So much, in fact, that we’ll need fourteen full days to get it all out there… As such, I’d like to announce The 14 Days of jQuery 1.4!

The New jQuery 1.4 Site

Beginning on January 14th, we’ll start a fourteen-day event. Each day we’ll have fresh videos and announcements — there’ll be code releases, project-related updates, and jQuery UI goodness, among other things. In addition to the announcements, we’ll also be releasing a set of videos over the 14 days with talks and tutorials relating the jQuery 1.4 release and other general jQuery topics. You’ll want to check back at jQuery14.com every day during the two weeks to see what’s new, or sign up to be notified via email. Think of it like an online conference, only longer, freer, and with a bit of mystery and suspense!

But Wait, There’s More!

We’ve got a lot planned for January 14th, but it seemed good to whet your appetite and pre-release some tasty jQuery morsels. Head over to jQuery14.com to learn all about the brand-new jQuery API site:

Be sure to subscribe to the jQuery14.com site or to the @jquery Twitter account for all the updates during these upcoming weeks.

Free Books, Anyone?

The jQuery project is a non-profit, open-source effort, and we rely heavily on donations and contributions to help fund everything we do. We’ll be running a fundraising drive starting now and throughout the 14 Days of jQuery. If you’re a jQuery user, show your support by making a tax-deductible donation of $20 USD or more to the project during the event, and you’ll receive a free jQuery book with your donation.

It’s always important to mention that much of this would not be possible without the help of the jQuery project sponsors; Netflix, JupiterIT Consulting, appendTo, Fusionary Media and Oxide Design Co have all signed on as official sponsors of the 14 Days of jQuery 1.4, along with our favorite jQuery book publishers, Manning, Packt, jQuery Enlightenment, and O’Reilly.

That’s it for now — head on over to jQuery14.com for much more to come!

jQuery 1.4 Alpha 2 Released

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jQuery 1.4 Alpha 2 is released! This is the second alpha release of jQuery 1.4 (alpha 1 was released previously). The code is stable (passing all tests in all browsers we support), feature-complete (we’re no longer accepting new features for the release), and needs to be tested in live applications.

Grab the code:

NOTE: If you’re using jQuery 1.4a2 and you run into an error please make sure that you’re using the regular version of the code, it’ll make it easier to spot where the error is occurring.

How can I help?

To start, try dropping the above un-minified version of jQuery 1.4a2 into a live application that you’re running. If you hit an exception or some weirdness occurs immediately login to the bug tracker and file a bug. Be sure to mention that you hit the bug in jQuery 1.4a2!

We’ll be closely monitoring the bug reports that come in and will work hard to fix any inconsistencies between jQuery 1.3.2 and jQuery 1.4.

With your input we should be able to produce a solid release. Right now we’re looking to push out at least one beta around the beginning of the new year and a final release candidate early in January. The final release will occur on January 14th, coinciding with jQuery’s 4th birthday. Thanks for your help in reviewing jQuery 1.4a2!

jQuery 1.4 Alpha 1 Released

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Hot off the presses: jQuery 1.4 Alpha 1 is released! This is the first alpha release of jQuery 1.4. The code is stable (passing all tests in all browsers we support), feature-complete (we’re no longer accepting new features for the release), and needs to be tested in live applications.

Grab the code:

NOTE: If you’re using jQuery 1.4a1 and you run into an error please make sure that you’re using the regular version of the code, it’ll make it easier to spot where the error is occurring.

How can I help?

To start, try dropping the above un-minified version of jQuery 1.4a1 into a live application that you’re running. If you hit an exception or some weirdness occurs immediately login to the bug tracker and file a bug. Be sure to mention that you hit the bug in jQuery 1.4a1!

We’ll be closely monitoring the bug reports that come in and will work hard to fix any inconsistencies between jQuery 1.3.2 and jQuery 1.4.

What to Watch For

There are a few areas in jQuery that have seen extensive changes since 1.3.2 was released:

  • live was drastically overhauled and now supports submit, change, mouseenter, mouseleave, focus, and blur events in all browsers. Also now supports context and data.
  • append, prepend, etc. have been heavily optimized.
  • add has been adjusted to always return elements in document order.
  • find, empty, remove, addClass, removeClass, hasClass, attr, and css have been heavily optimized.

Full details concerning the release are forthcoming – for now we just need your help in catch regressions. Some more details can be found in John Resig’s keynote at the 2009 jQuery Conference.

Note: There are still a few open bugs that we will be reviewing before jQuery 1.4 final is released.

With your input we should be able to produce a solid release. Right now we’re looking to push out at least one more alpha before the holiday season and a final release candidate early in January. Thanks for your help in reviewing jQuery 1.4a1!

jQuery Joins the Software Freedom Conservancy

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You’ve been hearing for almost a year now that the jQuery Project was going to join the Software Freedom Conservancy.  As we stated on January 14th, 2009:

By joining The Software Freedom Conservancy, the jQuery projects and community immediately realize some important benefits:

  • It allows the current project members to continue to manage the projects and maintain ultimate responsibility for the direction of current and future efforts.
  • It allows the projects to be considered a true non-profit efforts allowing us to be able to accept donations and contributions without incurring tremendous personal financial liability.
  • The copyright of the code will be assigned to the conservancy thus ensuring that no single person will own contributions or assets of the project.
  • It may allow corporations to write off time when an employee contributes to a project.
  • Most importantly, it ensures that the jQuery projects will always be open and free software.

This is a big step in formalizing the jQuery projects and an important accomplishment in ensuring that the investment being made by the jQuery community is protected.

The Software Freedom Conservancy outlines the benefits of joining quite well:

One of the principal benefits of joining the Conservancy is that member projects get all the protections of being a corporate entity without actually having to form and maintain one. These benefits include, most notably, the ability to collect earmarked project donations and protection from personal liability for the developers of the project. Projects can continue to operate in the same way they did before joining the Conservancy without having to select a board of directors or any other layer of corporate management, without having to maintain corporate records and without having to do any of the other things required of incorporated entities. The Conservancy handles all of that burden on behalf of its projects.

The Conservancy is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization, so member projects can receive tax-deductible donations to the extent permitted by law. The Conservancy files a single tax return that covers all of its member projects and handles other corporate and tax related issues on behalf of its members, who are, of course, always free to join and leave the Conservancy at any time. Additionally, by not having to form a new organization, projects avoid having to pay the fees and spend the time required by the state incorporation and federal tax exemption application processes.

On September 11th, 2009, at the jQuery DevDays in Boston, MA the whole team was together and the documents were signed to officially join the Conservancy.

jQuery Team Signs Documents to join Software Freedom Conservancy

Left to Right: Brandon Aaron, Rey Bango, John Resig, Paul Bakaus, Richard D. Worth and Cody Lindley look on as the documents are signed. (Photo by Jörn Zafferer)

Since then we’ve formed the jQuery Project and have formalized a voting process to vote on adding or removing voting members, financial spending, etc.  Voting is done in public, and you can monitor votes here.

jQuery’s financials have also been transferred to the Conservancy and all your great donations are now managed by the Conservancy based on the direction of the voting members of the jQuery team.

Late last month the final details required by the Conservancy were ironed out and on Tuesday this week the Conservancy welcomed the jQuery Project as its 19th member.

One final detail we are still working on is transferring the copyright of the code to the Foundation.  We are hoping to get that done in the near future.  Transferring the copyright to the Foundation will ensure that the code will live forever.

You can listen to John Resig talk more about joining the Software Freedom Conservancy in Episode 1 of the Official jQuery Podcast.