Foundation Board Update – Renewed Focus on Key Priorities

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In June, the jQuery Foundation Board of Directors held an in-person meeting, hosted by Famous in their San Francisco offices. During the meeting, the Board agreed to the following priorities to fulfill the Foundation’s Mission of improving the open web, making it accessible for everyone, through the development and support of open source software, and collaboration with the development community.

Our priorities are:

  1. Diversity: Open source depends on contributions. An organization’s vitality can be destroyed by having a closed group that excludes or even actively antagonizes newcomers. There is incredible value in having a diverse set of contributors with different cultures, backgrounds, perspectives, and skill sets. The jQuery Foundation is committed to improving diversity at all levels, from the development community in general to the projects we host and all the way to our own board, which we acknowledge isn’t very diverse today.
  2. Accessibility: As with diversity, this goal is again in the spirit of inclusiveness. Web technology has many features to make it friendly to users with sight, motor, or cognitive issues. Many web developers don’t know about them, or defeat them without realizing the implications. We want to change that. Last month’s jQuery SF conference had several excellent speakers who showed what the web can be like for some users: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWzEF1P-bvI#t=7h34m30s
  3. Education: This goal crosses all of our priorities and encompasses many different subjects. By educating developers, both on the world of open source and also on the issues of diversity and accessibility, we can make the web an inclusive place.

We will achieve these goals by focusing our efforts on three key areas:

  1. Actively Recruiting New Projects: As you can tell, the jQuery Foundation’s mission goes far beyond the original jQuery projects. We are looking to host projects that we can help. The Foundation offers projects greater visibility, a voice in the standards process, help in managing their community, infrastructure such as a CDN, and other benefits. Projects remain autonomous, the Foundation doesn’t dictate the project’s goals or roadmap. We can, however, offer financial support for meeting mutually agreed upon project goals.
  2. Defining and Delivering Essential (basic through advanced) Web Developer Education: We want to help developers learn how to contribute to open source projects, how to run open source projects, and how to build web sites or applications that apply best practices and beyond that, we want to educate developers on the importance and implementation of diversity and accessibility in their projects. Finally, we want to get the word out about how the jQuery Foundation can help developers do their jobs better.
  3. Growing Our Impact through Outreach: The jQuery Foundation can only accomplish its goals with the support of companies and individuals who believe in the mission. If you or your company is interested in joining us to improve the web development community, please get in touch [email protected]. Like the open source projects we host, the jQuery Foundation itself is powered by memberships, volunteers and donations! Those of you who have already contributed, we thank you for supporting the mission.

jQuery Foundation Project Updates

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In order to make it easier for jQuery Foundation Members and Web developers to quickly stay abreast of all our projects, we will periodically publish consolidated project updates here.

jQuery Core

Powering 2/3 of sites, jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library

Since last December’s release, the team has been hard at work on a major 3.0 release. This release – the alpha of which came out on July 8 – comes with many updates (including Promises/A+ compliant Deferreds) and bug fixes, and it finally removes some previously deprecated and underused features.

Links: download, meeting notes, full list of 3.0 changes

A big thank you to the core team and everyone who contributed – and will contribute – to the upcoming release.
Questions?  Contact Timmy Willison

globalize-mark-light (1) Globalize

JavaScript library for internationalization and localization that leverages the official Unicode CLDR JSON data.

Globalize version 1.0 was released in April and provides developers with localized number formatting and parsing, date and time formatting and parsing, relative time formatting, currency formatting, and message formatting (with pluralization and gender support) that runs in browsers and Node.js, consistently across all of them.

One exciting thing the community is focused on is the ability to compile Globalize for production. This will enable applications to generate custom runtime code that is extremely small and fast.

Links: git, mailing list,
Questions?  Contact Rafael Xavier de Souza

icn-jquerymobile-logo jQuery Mobile

Unified, HTML5-based user interface system for all popular mobile device platforms, built on the jQuery and jQuery UI foundation

The team has been heads down on version 1.5.0, which will bring numerous improvements including:

  • A new standalone enhancer module for customizable, fast declarative initialization of any javascript including jQuery widgets and plugins.
  • Improved and re-written shared with jQuery UI including button, checkboxradio, and controlgroup and the accordion widget which will replace the current collapsible and collapsible set widgets.
  • All of jQuery Mobile’s widget will now also feature the classes option for improved customizability and theming.
  • Re-written table and navbar widgets
  • Greatly improved modularity

Check out full release plans here

Links: download, meeting notes

Questions?  Contact Alexander Schmitz

Esprima

High performance, standard-compliant ECMAScript parser written in JavaScript

In March, we released Esprima 2.1.0, introducing support for several new pieces of ES6 syntax. In the mean time, a lot of work has been done to complete its ES6 support (check the roadmap). We’ve also improved the testing infrastructure and workflow to make the codebase more contributor-friendly.

Links: git, mailing list

A big thank you to all those who contributed patches to this release: Ariya Hidayat, Bei Zhang, Brandon Mills, Mike Rennie, Mike Sherov.

Questions?  Contact Ariya Hidayat

icn-ui-logo jQuery UI

Curated set of UI interactions, effects, widgets, and themes built on top of the jQuery Library.

The team released jQuery UI 1.11.4 in March, bringing bug fixes for Draggable, Resizable, Sortable, Accordion, Dialog, Slider, and Tooltip.

We are focused now on support for Pointer Events, and splitting up UI Core and old jQuery support to enable smaller builds

Links: git, meeting notes
Questions? Contact Scott González

ChassisChassis

Creating open standards for CSS libraries, JavaScript UI libraries, and web developers in general.

The team is working on its Phase One release which will involve an initial CSS Framework – this is planned for later this summer.

Work is also underway for a themeroller.

Links: git, meeting notes

Thanks to Micheal Arestad, Alexander Schmitz and Rohit Mulange

Questions?  Contact Sarah Frisk

qunitQUnit

Powerful, easy-to-use JavaScript unit testing framework

The latest release, 1.18.0, made a lot of improvements to the HTML reporter, making it more efficient to debug failures. For example, a new diff algorithm makes it easier to spot the difference in failed expected/actual assertions.

We’re currently working on the js-reporters project, which QUnit will implement, along with hopefully many other JavaScript testing frameworks and tools. The goal is to standardize an API with events and event data for test runners. A tool like Karma could then adopt a single interface instead of having to support each testing tool individually.

If you want to help moving QUnit along, check out these issues.

Links: git, meeting notes

Questions?  Contact Jörn Zaefferer

PEP

PointerEvents Polyfill: a unified event system for the web platform

PEP’s First release (0.3.0) came out in April and the the project is presently working to automate and improve the W3C test suite.

Links: git, meeting notes,

Questions?  Contact Scott González

Get Some Credit!

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Submit Your Project for the jQuery Foundation Web Excellence Program

How awesome is your project/site/integration/app? Probably really awesome, otherwise, you wouldn’t be doing it, right?!?

The jQuery Foundation wants to tell the world about all the incredible things developers are doing with jQuery Foundation projects. That’s why we are launching the jQuery Foundation Web Excellence program.

Here’s how it works:

  1. You pick the category or categories you in which want to submit (See category descriptions below)
  2. Tell us about you, your company/project, and how jQuery Foundation projects help you make it happen
  3. W’ll highlight projects on the jQuery Blog and promote it on social media

What are you waiting for? Get the the visibility you and your project deserve!  Go to the Web Excellence Submission Form and submit your project Today!

Category Descriptions

  • All Around Rock Star: This category highlights the sites/apps that leverage any jQuery Foundation project to produce a stellar digital experience. Please highlight your approach to leveraging jQuery Foundation tools, libraries and resources stand-alone or in combination with other Open Web components and frameworks to solve real problems and delight users.
  • Mobile Masterpiece: This category highlights the sites/apps that use any jQuery Foundation project to engage consistently with users across all devices, including mobile.
  • Enterprise: Highlights the organizations leveraging any jQuery Foundation project to help their enterprise organization (5,000 and up employees) achieve strategic IT and/or business objectives (e.g.  system integration, uptime, compatibility/accessibility, revenue, cost reduction).
  • Top Speed: Highlights the organizations that use any jQuery Foundation project as part of a rapid project/product launch and/or to achieve fast site/app performance.  Do your users have a need for speed that jQuery Foundation projects help you deliver? Tell us about it!
  • Globetrotter: Showcases the sites, apps, systems or projects that best demonstrate the power of Globalize when implemented stand-alone or in combination with other jQuery Foundation projects.
  • Powered by jQuery: Showcases the SDKs and other toolsets that leverage any jQuery Foundation project as a dependency.

Rules & Terms:

  • There is no fee to enter
  • Only English language submissions will be accepted
  • Your entry must be submitted using the Submission Form
  • Please provide box/drive links to all graphics/visuals in your text answers, so the desired placement is clear
  • You may submit for multiple categories, but please make individual submissions for each desired category
  • jQuery Foundation reserves the right to change or cancel a category at any time
  • A selection of submitted entries will be publicly displayed on the jQuery Foundation web site and promoted via our social media channels
  • Submitting an entry gives the jQuery Foundation the permission and approval to leverage submitted content for Marketing and Public Relations purposes

jQuery 3.0 and jQuery Compat 3.0 Alpha Versions Released

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It’s been a long time since we did a major release, and you certainly deserve one. So we’re glad to announce the first alpha of jQuery 3.0!

Despite the 3.0 version number, we anticipate that these releases shouldn’t be too much trouble when it comes to upgrading existing code. Yes, there are a few breaking changes that justified the major version bump, but we’re hopeful these breakages don’t actually affect that many people. The jQuery Migrate plugin can help you to identify compatibility issues in your code as well. Your feedback on the changes in this alpha will help us greatly, so please try it out on your existing code and plugins!

There are actually two releases here. First is jQuery 3.0, which supports modern browsers and environments from IE9 forward. Second is jQuery Compat 3.0, which includes support for IE8. As an added bonus, both jQuery and jQuery Compat will include support for Yandex.Browser, a freeware browser released in 2012. You can get the files from the jQuery CDN, or link to them directly:

https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.0.0-alpha1.js

https://code.jquery.com/jquery-compat-3.0.0-alpha1.js

You can also get the alpha versions from npm:

npm install [email protected]

npm install [email protected]

 

Major changes

Below are just the highlights of the major new features, improvements, and bug fixes in these releases. A complete list of changes is available at the bottom of this post and on our GitHub issue tracker. On GitHub, you can additionally see the features we expect to put in later beta and final versions that have yet to land.

Simplified .show() and .hide() methods

Everyone’s mental model of jQuery’s .hide() method is that it sets display: none in CSS. Conversely, .show() clears the display so that the element shows again (assuming its parents are not hidden). Simple, right?

Well, no. There are actually many complex special cases that people asked us to “fix” over the years, which turned these methods into a convoluted confluence of principles. For example, what if the element is set to display: none in a stylesheet? jQuery would try to override that by forcing display: block on the element directly. Okay, but what if a normally block element like <li> was set to display: inline by a different stylesheet rule? How about the case where you call these methods on an element before it’s been added to the document and we don’t know what display value it will have? Determining all of that takes extra work. Sometimes it’s still just a guess that turns out to be wrong.

Since these methods add a style attribute to the element, they don’t tend to play well with techniques like responsive design where the visibility of elements may also be set by media queries. This leads to the need for jQuery handlers that listen for the orientationchange or resize events and manually hide or show parts of the page; it defeats the elegant solution that media queries were trying to implement.

You can see that jQuery was already about halfway down the path to total madness, and it didn’t make sense to complete the journey. The special cases and checks were not only complex and incomplete, but they caused significant performance issues on large pages.

So, instead, we’re experimentally defying the evolution of these methods and reverting to a simple, primordial model. This will break some code. If you have elements in a stylesheet that are set to display: none, the .show() method will no longer override that. So the most important rule for moving to jQuery 3.0 is this: Don’t use a stylesheet to set the default of display: none and then try to use .show() – or any method that shows elements, such as .slideDown() and .fadeIn() – to make it visible.

If you need an element to be hidden by default, the best way is to add a class name like “hidden” to the element and define that class to be display: none in a stylesheet. Then you can add or remove that class using jQuery’s .addClass() and .removeClass() methods to control visibility. Alternately, you can have a .ready() handler call .hide() on the elements before they are displayed on the page. Or, if you really must retain the stylesheet default, you can use .css("display", "block") (or the appropriate display value) to override the stylesheet.

We know that this is likely to be one of the most contentious and difficult changes in jQuery 3.0, so we wanted to put it out in this early release to see the effects. Please let us know how it affects your code and what you need to change in order to work with this new model.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1767
https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2057
https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2308

Special case with .data() names

We have updated our .data() implementation to closer match the HTML5 dataset specification. All keys are now converted from kebab-case to camelCase, regardless of access method, and digits no longer participate in the conversion. For example, we will no longer differentiate between “foo-bar” and “fooBar”, but will differentiate between “foo-42” and “foo42”. These changes will mainly come into play when retrieving all data by calling .data() with no arguments, or when trying to access the data using a converted key (.data(“foo42”)) instead of the original (.data(“foo-42”)).

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1751

jQuery.Deferred is now Promises/A+ compatible

jQuery.Deferred objects have been updated for compatibility with Promises/A+ and ES2015 Promises, verified with the Promises/A+ Compliance Test Suite. This meant the introduction of a .catch() method and some major changes to the .then() method:

  • An exception thrown in a .then() callback now becomes a rejection value. Previously, exceptions bubbled all the way up, aborting callback execution and irreversibly locking both the parent and child Deferred objects.
  • The resolution state of a Deferred created by .then() is now controlled by its callbacks—exceptions become rejection values and non-thenable returns become fulfillment values. Previously, returns from rejection handlers became rejection values.
  • Callbacks are always invoked asynchronously. Previously, they would be called immediately upon binding or resolution, whichever came last.
  • Progress callbacks can no longer resolve Deferred objects to which they are bound.

Consider the following, in which a parent Deferred is rejected and a child callback generates an exception:

var parent = jQuery.Deferred();
var child = parent.then( null, function() {
  return "bar";
});
var callback = function( state ) {
  return function( value ) {
    console.log( state, value );
    throw new Error( "baz" );
  };
};
var grandchildren = [
  child.then( callback( "fulfilled" ), callback( "rejected" ) ),
  child.then( callback( "fulfilled" ), callback( "rejected" ) )
];
parent.reject( "foo" );
console.log( "parent resolved" );

As of jQuery 3.0, this will log “parent resolved” before invoking any callback, each child callback will then log “fulfilled bar”, and the grandchildren will be rejected with Error “baz”. In previous versions, this would log “rejected bar” (the child Deferred having been rejected instead of fulfilled) once and then immediately terminate with uncaught Error “baz” (“parent resolved” not being logged and the grandchildren remaining unresolved).

While caught exceptions had advantages for in-browser debugging, it is far more declarative (i.e. explicit) to handle them with rejection callbacks. Keep in mind that this places the responsibility on you to always add at least one rejection callback when working with promises. Otherwise, any errors will go unnoticed.

Legacy behavior can be recovered by replacing use of .then() with the now-deprecated .pipe() method (which has an identical signature).

jQuery.when has also been updated to accept any thenable object, which includes native Promise objects.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1722
https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2102

Removed special-case Deferred methods in jQuery.ajax

jqXHR object is a Promise, but also has extra methods like .abort() so that you can stop a request after it has been made.

As users increasingly embrace the Promise pattern for asynchronous work like AJAX, the idea of having special cases for the Promise returned by jQuery.ajax is an increasingly bad idea.

success, error, complete
done, fail, always

Note that this does not have any impact at all on the callbacks of the same name, which continue to exist and are not deprecated. This only affects the Promise methods!

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2084

Error cases don’t silently fail

Perhaps in a profound moment you’ve wondered, “What is the offset of a window?” Then you probably realized that is a crazy question – how can a window even have an offset?

In the past, jQuery has sometimes tried to make cases like this return something rather than having them throw errors. In this particular case of asking for the offset of a window, the answer up to now has been { top: 0, left: 0 } With this alpha of jQuery 3.0 we’re experimenting with the idea of having such cases throw errors so that crazy requests aren’t silently ignored. Please try the alpha and see if there is any code out there depending on jQuery to mask problems with invalid inputs.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1784

.width(), .height(), .css(“width”), and .css(“height”) to return decimal values (whenever the browser does)

Previously, jQuery rounded values when retrieving width and height. Some browsers return subpixel values – such as IE and Firefox – and sometimes users need this precision when relying on these values for layout. We don’t expect this change to have a big impact on your code, but let us know if it does.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1724

Removed deprecated event aliases

.load, .unload, and .error, deprecated since jQuery 1.8, are no more. Use .on() to register listeners.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2286

jQuery.swap, jQuery.buildFragment, and jQuery.domManip are no longer accessible on the jQuery object

These methods were always intended for internal use only and were never documented. We are finally making them private to avoid confusion.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2224
https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2225

Animations now use requestAnimationFrame

On platforms that support the requestAnimationFrame API, which is pretty much everywhere but IE8 and IE9, jQuery will now use that API when performing animations. This should result in animations that are smoother and use less CPU time – and save battery as well on mobile devices.

jQuery tried using requestAnimationFrame a few years back but there were serious compatibility issues with existing code so we had to back it out. We think we’ve beaten most of those issues by suspending animations while a browser tab is out of view. Still, any code that depends on animations to always run in nearly real-time is making an unrealistic assumption.

.unwrap( selector )

Before jQuery 3.0, the .unwrap() method did not take any arguments. The selector parameter offers a way to be specific about which wrappers to remove.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/1744

Massive speedups for some jQuery custom selectors

Thanks to some detective work by Paul Irish at Google, we identified some cases where we could skip a bunch of extra work when custom selectors like :visible are used many times in the same document. That particular case is up to 17 times faster now!

Keep in mind that even with this improvement, selectors like :visible and :hidden can be expensive because they depend on the browser to determine whether elements are actually displaying on the page. That may require, in the worst case, a complete recalculation of CSS styles and page layout! While we don’t discourage their use in most cases, we recommend testing your pages to determine if these selectors are causing performance issues.

https://github.com/jquery/jquery/issues/2042

 

Thanks

Many thanks to all of you who participated in this release by testing, reporting bugs, or submitting patches, including Chris Antaki, Jason Bedard, Leonardo Braga, Bastian Buchholz, Anne-Gaelle Colom, David Corbacho, Brenard Cubacub, Hamish Dickson, Ben Edelman, Stephen Edgar, elas7, flexphperia, Corey Frang, Xue Fuqiao, Oleg Gaidarenko, Richard Gibson, Michał Gołębiowski, Scott González, goob, Veaceslav Grimalschi, Mu Haibao, Dan Hart, Frederic Hemberger, Nicolas Henry, Daniel Herman, Jon Hester, Victor Homyakov, Winston Howes, Daniel Husar, Essam Al Joubori, Veres Lajos, George Mauer, Richard McDaniel, Amit Merchant, Calvin Metcalf, Dave Methvin, MightyBranch, Nazar Mokrynskyi, Matthew Mueller, Martin Naumann, Alexander O’Mara, Randson Oliveira, Gilad Peleg, James Pearce, PJ, Senya Pugach, Aditya Raghavan, Chris Rebert, Aurelio De Rosa, Gabriel Schulhof, Mike Sidorov, Nick Stefan, Arthur Stolyar, Timo Tijhof, Ben Toews, Thomas Tortorini, Shivaji Varma, Arthur Verschaeve, Rick Waldron, Bin Xin, Imran M Yousuf, Jörn Zaefferer.

 

Changes

Here is the full list of changes since the last official releases (1.11.3 and 2.1.4):

 

Common to both jQuery and jQuery Compat

Ajax

  • Always use script injection in globalEval (#14757, bbdfbb4)
  • Remove jsonp callbacks through “jQuery#removeProp” method (#2323, a2ae215)
  • remove event dependency from the ajax module (4e7f34f)
  • Fix for request aborted in ajaxSend (#1775, 598ed05)
  • use anchor tag for parsing urls (#1875, b091fdb)
  • Fix cross-domain detection test for non-default port (83b038f)
  • $.post and $.get can now take an options object (#1986, 89ce0af)
  • simplify one ajax call and add explanatory comment (0ac28ed)
  • make jQuery#load “type” field explicit (4ef120d)
  • replace “jqXHR.complete” callback with “always” (97ef1f2)
  • remove deprecated extensions from ajax promise (#2084, 9d1b989)
  • remove use of jQuery#each second argument (a4715f4)
  • remove “onunload” event handler (a117dd0)
  • Remove remnants of the load event alias handling (38a6697)

Attributes

  • add SVG class manipulation (#2199, 20aaed3)
  • return null when attribute does not exist (#2118, aaeed53)
  • Use the option val hook in select val hook and simplify it (#1902, f6302b0)
  • remove unnecessary element null check (55ac56a)
  • fix failing test for new return value (5dc4616)
  • revert returning null for non-elements (7632b74)
  • revert returning null for non-existant attributes (2905961)

Build

  • update Sizzle to 2.0.0 (bcca4f0)
  • Update grunt-contrib-jshint (1556c46)
  • remove bower.json lint target (285cfbf)
  • add mailmap entry (3ec73ef)
  • Update the license attribute (#2331, 8e92e1e)
  • drop bower; use npm for front-end deps (#15186, e1949f4)
  • update front-end dependencies (8356948)
  • update node dependencies barring jscs (8e3a0ce)
  • update grunt-jscs-checker and pass with the new rules (c869a1e)
  • update requirejs dependency to 2.1.17 (#2290, a644101)
  • update source map options for the new grunt jshint (269a27c)
  • bower.json: remove moot `version` field (61e21a4)
  • fix broken assertions caused by QUnit update (8b6aeae)
  • Update commitplease dev dependency (39b7606)
  • remove deprecated JSHint options (34da7d5)
  • update AUTHORS.txt (8f13997)
  • Upgrade to commitplease 2.0.0 (5bc1ddc)
  • Update QUnit to latest (1.17.1) (2d5c5d2)
  • update version to 3.0.0-pre (7a607c5)
  • Move test to appropriate module (fbdbb6f)
  • Fix various typos (dc4b914)
  • Speed up the Travis build (31f4f8e)
  • Remove empty define({}) from build output (#1768, 2c1b556)
  • Remove npm from dependencies (b92acf7)
  • Upgrade to grunt-bowercopy 1.0.0 (323e82c)
  • Remove unused Sizzle test files (8d11310)
  • fix tests in AMD mode (6051609)
  • Move all external libraries to external directory (c5d9d88)
  • account for version labels in Sizzle versions (#1939, 78ac753)
  • update node dependencies (9101704)
  • Sizzle version labels must start with a dash (d6c97ab)
  • Don’t assume the browser environment; smoke test on Node w/ jsdom (#1950, 76df9e4)
  • Remove dates from copyright notice (66e1b6b)
  • Specify valid components for commit messages (0c9d018)
  • ignore test dependencies for npm install (35f8e15)
  • update Sizzle to 1.11.1 and include license (c0b23e2)
  • update Sizzle (#2042, #1969, 3a0dd5a)
  • update grunt-bowercopy (712e78c)
  • Update license (4f776e5)
  • Sanctify the component name status of Wrap (a4133ff)
  • Update native-promise-only (again) (f5aa89a)
  • Rearrange grunt/npm tasks into a build/dist/test pattern (bb928bd)
  • Update native-promise-only (0065e1f)
  • save sinon update for later (#2160, 98c25b7)

Callbacks

Core

  • Return empty array instead of null for parseHTML(“”) (#1997, 4116914)
  • use document.implemenation.createHTMLDocument in jQuery.parseHTML (58c2460)
  • Follow the AMD specification for define (892625b)
  • Throw an error on $(“#”) rather than returning 0-length collection (80022c8)
  • allow init to accept an alternate rootjQuery for migrate’s sake (#2101, 7a6931d)
  • remove unnecessary support test for createHTMLDocument (5923282)
  • pass empty string to createHTMLDocument to appease IE (31c7d7f)
  • revert addition of createHTMLDocument. Thanks, Safari 8. (b779831)
  • Update tested jsdom, drop obsolete workarounds (#2153, 06f6cd1)
  • re-introduce createHTMLDocument in parseHTML; Safari 8 left out (cfe468f)
  • Standardize indexOf comparisons (53aa87f)
  • remove custom ready event (#2264, c252c5f)
  • Consistently use local reference to access() (2fb719e)
  • Remove deprecated context and selector properties (#1908, 0ea8c32)
  • remove isArraylike check for nodes (#2238, 436f0ae)
  • add support to tag-hyphenated elements (534f130)
  • Use window.setTimeout & friends instead of global equivalents (#2177, 219c749)
  • Drop size and andSelf methods (#1749, f110360)
  • Drop strundefined variable (29838b6)
  • Make jQuery objects iterable (#1693, bb026fc)
  • add workaround for iOS JIT error in isArrayLike (#2145, 1541664)
  • Test all factory use cases from intro.js (#2181, ab40725)
  • Switch from modules to just window.setTimeout etc. (842958e)
  • Align branches: remove an unused variable, add comments (f6de5a9)
  • simplify “each” stylesheet iteration test (fcb6c4d)
  • Simplify and speed up .each (eeda11c)
  • organize prop & attr code to be similar (5153b53)
  • change jQuery.each and jQuery#each signatures (#2090, 2380028)

CSS

  • CSS:Event: simplification of native method signatures (85577a3)
  • Fix the “sanity check” test (995f707)
  • Remove non-functional unit test for negative margin (4ab7431)
  • Add an integration test for issue gh-1764 (8887106)
  • Remove use of getDefaultComputedStyle (#15227, 274feb5)
  • Use pre-defined displays for html and body (a772418)
  • Correct typo in the comment (7e09619)
  • Removed redundant “to the number” in comment (895ea68)
  • fix :visible/:hidden selectors for inline element w/ content (#2227, 79bcb29)
  • Support relative adjustment in any applicable unit (#1711, 9b03f6d)
  • elements are hidden when either offsetWidth or offsetHeight is zero (#10406, #13132, 10399dd)
  • Ignore the CSS cascade in show()/hide()/etc. (#1767, #2071, 86419b1)
  • Fix the pixelMarginRight support test in Android 2.3 (cdfc2d0)
  • Clean up memory leak in reliableMarginRight (#1795, 7d15b4d)
  • Don’t cache unrecognized CSS property names (#2015, d471842)
  • Don’t name the anonymous swap function (0019a46)
  • make the getStyles function more readable (3a0d582)
  • Work around an IE11 fullscreen dimensions bug (#1764, 90d828b)
  • Add unit tests for negative margins and positioning (1b932bb)
  • simplify “defaultDisplay” module (c62486f)
  • Make .css(“width”) & .css(“height”) return fractional values (#1724, b60b26e)
  • Don’t expose jQuery.swap (#2058, bb4d888)
  • Improve a comment explaining IE11 fullscreen bug (8e4aac8)

Data

  • do not include digits when camelCasing (#1751, 2862a07)
  • always camelCase keys in .data() (#2257, 0e79098)
  • Use a PDF object instead of a Java applet for acceptData testing (#1938, 087d280)
  • camelCasing should not ignore case (#2070, 172cad8)

Deferred

Dimensions

  • allow modification of coordinates argument (#1848, f7e60dc)

Docs

  • 1.x-master branch -> compat branch; 2.x branch -> master branch (758fd6c)
  • correct grunt command in README.md (#1850, 9d6beac)
  • remove redundant instruction from the readme (#2359, 3c92770)
  • Clarify custom build instructions (a3779bc)

Effects

  • Adding unit tests for jQuery.Animation (b3b2d6c)
  • Reintroduce use of requestAnimationFrame (#15147, 72119e0)
  • add tests for jQuery.easing._default in Animation and Tween (6d7ef56)
  • set default easing using jQuery.easing._default (#2219, 5f2ea40)
  • Add tests for jQuery.Tween (cdaed15)
  • Improve raf logic (708764f)

Events

  • remove preDispatch hook & simplify “simulate” signature (3655c4e)
  • remove guard for falsy handler argument of jQuery#on method (fac67a9)
  • add support comment (9db9316)
  • correct support comment (361a0d5)
  • HTML5 drop events inherit from MouseEvent (#2009, d7e5fce)
  • Fully clean up events in unit test (4467ed6)
  • Empty namespaces should be uneventfully ignored (8653068)
  • remove outdated originalEvent hack (6df669f)
  • Remove fake originalEvent from jQuery.Event.simulate (#2300, 7475d5d)
  • fix incorrect window bug with scrollTop/Left in iframes (#1945, d21edb5)
  • remove deprecated event aliases (#2286, 0705be4)
  • Add a note about a mouseenter bug in Chrome (a5e1c9b)
  • Restore the `constructor` property on jQuery.Event prototype (#15090, b807aed)
  • Copy detail property to jQuery.Event on native events (#1867, d9ed166)
  • Remove an internal argument to the on method (04a2969)
  • Normalize mouse event properties in drag events (#1925, 97cf528)
  • provide verbose comment for focus(in | out) & rename support prop (c074006)
  • remove redundant guards for the event methods (#2047, a873558)

Manipulation

Misc

  • Drop support for older browsers; update support comments (740e190)
  • Need for speed removed by 9ad6e7e (ff928f5)
  • Mac OS is now OS X, thanks @xfq (d30c482)

Offset

  • remove ownerDocument check in offset getter (#2115, 6176567)
  • Round offset value for the sake of floating errors (#2147, 62ae2d0)
  • return zeros for disconnected/hidden elements (#2310, 40dcc76)
  • Fix .offset() to correctly work with ShadowDOM (#1784, 1617479)
  • account for scroll when calculating position (#1708, 2d71594)
  • don’t run scrollTop/scrollLeft iframe test in Android 2.3 & 4.0 (#1981, 0c46643)
  • return before getBoundingClientRect to avoid error in IE8-11 (0e4477c)
  • add tests for hidden elements + scroll (b041242)
  • simplify jQuery#offsetParent method (74ae544)

README

  • Fix punctuation in tile (df62159)
  • Fix minor style issues. Thanks @MightyBranch! (edfc94d)
  • update the Homebrew site address (b410b15)
  • various text fixes (31b63fc)
  • Update the description of the deprecated module (1d75273)
  • Improve build instructions (2e9c1ea)

Release

  • update AUTHORS.txt (e905dcd)
  • Remove copying of jquery-latest files (c34ed46)
  • properly set the dist remote when it’s a real release (c44dd77)
  • bower.json is actually generated from scratch (61224f5)
  • Distribute files to distribution repo (#1869, #1673, #2045, 26eca14)
  • dist can be run during a test (aae998b)
  • push dist to same remote as project (1ba45fc)
  • remove sourcemap comment from all copies of minified file (#1707, a76c781)
  • fix CDN archive creation (#1940, e0673df)

Selector/Sizzle

  • add jQuery.uniqueSort; deprecate jQuery.unique (#2228, e1090c3)
  • add test for jQuery.unique() alias (add85af)
  • Remove “#” exception for identifier tokens (86e62d8)
  • update to 2.1.1 (7602dc7)

Support

  • Re-organize browser order, add Safari 8 (43faf6d)
  • Correct iOS 8 support test results, re-arrange entries (ce308e2)

Tests

  • Update QUnit (6748ba3)
  • Minor updates for QUnit 1.16 compatibility (26276a3)
  • Accommodate page changes from the QUnit HTML reporter (3c13f4c)
  • Increase QUnit timeout (ff18d8e)
  • Tilt at a few style guide windmills (906caeb)
  • Correct a typo in the regex matching Safari 8 (c17543f)
  • Add Microsoft Edge results (from Windows 10 build 10130) (8e111df)
  • Remove Edge version from the user agent (5a1217e)
  • Remove test/data/ua.txt (#2398, e831856)
  • fix tests in accordance with new :visible behavior (16713fb)
  • add the current version of node and iojs to the travis config (bd9a138)
  • Expand CSS relative adjustment tolerance for IE (e22ef5d)
  • Fix CSS relative adjustment test for round-down browsers (48be675)
  • Lower the checks rounding error (a44cfa0)
  • make top of the HTML suite compliant with style guide (8356281)

Wrap

  • Support .unwrap( selector) for selective unwrapping (#1744, 7b09235)

 

jQuery 3.0 Only

Ajax

  • Remove workaround for IE6/7 (e519098)
  • simplify jQuery.parseXML method (5a0867d)

Build

  • use different versions of jsdom for Node and iojs testing (#2266, 5c3101f)
  • Refactor Node smoke tests (9c8a3ec)
  • Moved JSHint directives to .jshintrc file (15a609f)

CSS

  • save 20 bytes in css/support (45ec73f)
  • Collapse a double if statement into one (7855a1a)
  • Restore the hack to get pixels for .css(‘width’) etc. (3747cc6)

Data

  • shave off a couple of bytes (6f65f5f)
  • avoid Object.defineProperties for nodes (#1728, 95fb798)
  • avoid non-alphanumeric chars in expando properties (0cdec79)
  • updates to element[expando] cache (222ac3a)
  • move element cache to element[expando] (#1734, d702b76)
  • remove some unused code (764dc94)
  • remove the expando when there’s no more data (#1760, 56bb677)
  • speed up $.fn.data() for camel-cased key (#1941, 72c4a06)
  • restore explicit data removal of private data in cleanData. (#2127, 332fd94)
  • Drop the tests relying on applets (#1938, 95c0a10)

Docs

  • Add info about Sizzle not being excludable on the compat branch (#2184, 062b526)
  • Fix README uppercase (b50e0f2)

Manipulation

  • Tolerate XMLNode host object input to getAll (#15151, 1ae025e)
  • Check state lost if the name is set for Android 4.0-4.3 (1bbb678)

Misc

  • Adjust comments & docs to dropping IE * Misc: Update all references to bugs.jquery.com (#1681, 3e89a53)
  • Remove leftover -moz-box-sizing in tests (e81b258)

Offset

  • Simplified a conditional (4287442)
  • don’t run scrollTop/scrollLeft iframe test in mobile Safari (4ab8603)

README

  • Add selector-native.js link. Thanks @randsonjs! (cfe2eae)

Tests

  • Remove a trailing comma for compatibility with the compat branch (dc8ba6a)

 

jQuery Compat 3.0 only

Ajax

  • Add support comment and fix code style issue (e38a94a)
  • Run the PATCH test only in IE8 on TestSwarm (#1994, 2524da0)
  • move explanatory comment to appropriate place (04fc801)
  • Use the native XHR for all non-local requests in IE9+ (#1684, 61f812b)
  • Rename Spartan to Edge in a comment (8d88cd5)
  • Fix the XHR fallback logic for IE8 (bd699cb)

Attributes

  • Use typeof check for getAttribute method (075da30)
  • don’t test SVG CSS-class manipulation in IE8 (57fb2dc)
  • fix IE8 issues (f2bcf87)

Build

  • Point to files from the compat branch, not master (b7663ea)
  • Put “jQuery Compat” in banners in built files (8cd6875)
  • 1.x-master -> compat (2912ddd)
  • Add “timers_ie.js” file back to the repo (31e6697)
  • append “+compat” to tag version and jQuery.fn.jquery (#2269, d18b645)
  • Correct indentation issue (d0f27a7)

Callbacks

  • Change broken url to wayback one (e4cbc97)

Core

  • Align code in intro.js with master (fe2a584)

CSS

  • Add a support test for the hack for .css(‘marginRight’) etc. (25bc680)
  • Fix get upper case alpha opacity in IE8 (#1705, c5e8e12)
  • simplify hack of css getter for the computed values (dac716c)
  • fix dependency order for amd (e185aa3)

Data

  • use removeAttribute in cleanData to bypass Chrome bug (#1664, 9d1d90e)

Deferred

  • pass lint in new catch tests (203979d)

Docs

Effects

Events

  • Add reference to data module (2866da9)
  • correct an unfinished comment (ac23f91)

Manipulation

  • don’t test data-URI with script element in IE8 (503e545)
  • Plug an IE8 memory leak in noCloneEvent feature detect (#1840, faf295a)
  • Update html5shiv elements (#15241, a953389)
  • blacklist IE8 from running tests for tag-hyphenated elems (87bb713)

Misc

Offset

  • allow offset setter to throw for disconnected elements (#2114, dc49f62)
  • getBounding doesn’t return width/height in IE8. Fixes test. (3b1de11)
  • fix iframe scrollTop/Left test for IE8 (d632699)
  • fix iframe scrollTop/Left test for IE8 and iPhone (62a333e)
  • revert to jQuery.contains for IE8’s sake (compat only) (6df3990)
  • no need to check for ownerDocument (523de77)

Tests

  • Restore IE8 workarounds (Sinon timers for IE & HTML5 shiv) (0b07c65)

Traversing

  • simplify jQuery#contents method (7230df1)

jQuery 1.11.3 and 2.1.4 Released – iOS Fail-Safe Edition

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Here we are again. It’s too late for April Fools, so you can believe us when we tell you that we have two new patch releases for you: jQuery 1.11.3 and 2.1.4.

These releases include a hot-fix for a rare bug in iOS 8.2 and 8.3. This is the only change. As with 1.11.2 and 2.1.3, we do not anticipate any issues when upgrading. However, if you do encounter bugs in upgrading from the previous versions, please let us know.

You can include these files directly from the jQuery CDN if you like, or copy them to your own local server. The 1.x branch includes support for IE 6/7/8 and the 2.x branch does not.

https://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.11.3.js

https://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.1.4.js

These updates are already available as the current versions on npm and Bower. Information on all the ways to get jQuery is available at https://jquery.com/download/. Please keep in mind that public, third-party CDNs receive their copies today and it can take a few days to post the files. If you’re anxious to get started, our CDN is always available.

Many thanks to all of you who participated in this release by testing, reporting bugs, or submitting patches, including John-David Dalton, Michał Gołębiowski, Oleg Gaidarenko, Richard Gibson, Dave Methvin, Benjamin Poulain, and Oz Solomon.

Thanks for all your support, and we look forward to showing you all we have in store for jQuery 3.0!

 

Announcing Globalize 1.0

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The jQuery Foundation is excited to announce the 1.0 release of the Globalize project, our internationalization (i18n) library. This release has been a long time coming and as Globalize picks up steam and gains more and more adoption every day, we are proud to finally announce the first stable release of this project. We could go on about the features and benefits of this latest release but we felt it was important that you hear it from the source. Below, Rafael Xavier, the lead for the Globalize project, details everything you need to know about the 1.0 release of Globalize and what is yet to come.

An always up-to-date, modular and simple i18n library

Allow me to skip the details and jump to the fun part. Below is what you get with Globalize today, which provides number formatting and parsing, date and time formatting and parsing, currency formatting, message formatting (ICU message format pattern with gender and pluralization support).

Date formatting and parsing

The date module provides methods that convert dates and times from their internal representations to textual form (formatting) and back again (parsing) in a language-independent manner. Your code can conveniently control the length of the formatted date, time, datetime.

locale .dateFormatter({ datetime: "medium" })( new Date() );
en "Feb 20, 2015, 12:15:00 PM"
zh "2015年2月20日 下午12:15:00"
zh-u-nu-native "二〇一五年二月二〇日 下午一二:一五:〇〇"
es "20 de feb. de 2015 12:15:00"
ar "٢٠‏/٠٢‏/٢٠١٥ ١٢،١٥،٠٠ م"

Your code can even select the fields individually, completely independent of the locale conventions. The pattern “GyMMMd” selects era in its abbreviated form, year, month in its abbreviated form, and day.

locale .dateFormatter({ skeleton "GyMMMd" })( new Date() );
en "Feb 20, 2015 AD"
zh "公元2015年2月20日"
es "20 feb. de 2015 d. C."
ar "٢٠ فبراير، ٢٠١٥ م"

 

Relative time formatting

In addition to formatting dates and times, the relative time module provides internationalized messages for date and time fields, using customary word or phrase when available.

locale, value .relativeTimeFormatter( "day" )( value );
en, -15 "15 days ago"
en, 0 "today"
en, 1 "tomorrow"

 

Number formatting and parsing

The number module provides methods that format and parse numbers. Your code can be completely independent of the locale conventions for decimal points, thousands-separators, or even the particular decimal digits used, or whether the number format is even decimal. Though, it can still conveniently control various aspects of the formatted number like the minimum and maximum fraction digits, integer padding, rounding method, display as percentage, and others.

locale .numberFormatter()( Math.PI );
en (English) "3.142"
es (Spanish) "3,142"
ar (Arabic) "٣٫١٤٢"

Formatting thousands-separators:

locale .numberFormatter()( 1000000 );
en-US (English as spoken in the United States) "1,000,000"
en-IN (English as spoken in India) "10,00,000"

Formatting percentages:

locale .numberFormatter({ style: "percent" })( 0.15 );
en (English) "15%"
es (Spanish) "15 %"
ar (Arabic) "١٥٪"

 

Currency formatting

The currency module provides methods that allow to format a currency. Your code can be completely independent of the locale conventions for which currency symbol to use, whether or not there’s a space between the currency symbol and the value, the side where the currency symbol must be placed, or even decimal digits used by particular currencies. Currencies can be displayed using symbols (the default), accounting form, 3-letter code, or plural messages.

Formatting currencies using symbols:

3-letter currency code en (English) de (German) zh (Chinese) ar (Arabic)
.currencyFormatter( "USD" )( 1 ); "$1.00" "1,00 $" "US$ 1.00" "US$ ١٫٠٠"
.currencyFormatter( "EUR" )( 1 ); "€1.00" "1,00 €" "€ 1.00" "€ ١٫٠٠"
.currencyFormatter( "CNY" )( 1 ); "CN¥1.00" "1,00 CN¥" "¥ 1.00" "ي.ص ١٫٠٠"
.currencyFormatter( "JPY" )( 1 ); "¥1" "1 ¥" "JP¥ 1" "JP¥ ١"
.currencyFormatter( "GBP" )( 1 ); "£1.00" "1,00 £" "£ 1.00" "£ ١٫٠٠"
.currencyFormatter( "BRL" )( 1 ); "R$1.00" "1,00 R$" "R$ 1.00" "R$ ١٫٠٠"

Formatting currencies in their full names:

locale .currencyFormatter( "USD", { style: "name" })( 1 );
en (English) "1.00 US dollar"
de (German) "1,00 US-Dollar"
zh (Chinese) "1.00美元"
ar (Arabic) "١٫٠٠ دولار أمريكي"

Formatting currencies in the accounting form, which, for example, in the English locale uses parens instead of the minus sign for negative numbers:

locale .currencyFormatter( "USD", { style: "accounting" })( -1 );
en (English) "($1.00)"

 

ICU message format support (with gender and pluralization support)

The message module provides methods that allow for the creation of internationalized messages, with optional arguments (variables/placeholders) allowing for simple replacement, gender and plural inflections. The arguments can occur in any order, which is necessary for translation into languages with different grammars.

Globalize.loadMessages({
  en: {
   likeIncludingMe: [
      "{count, plural,",
      "    one {You have one task remaining}",
      "  other {You have {count} tasks remaining}",
      "}"
    ]
  }
});

 

locale, count .messageFormatter( "likeIncludingMe" )({ count: count });
en, 1 "You have one task remaining"
en, 99 "You have 99 tasks remaining"

 

Built on standards

Globalize is based on the Unicode Consortium standards and specifications (UTS#35) and it uses its Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR), the largest and most extensive standard repository of locale data available. CLDR is constantly updated and is used by many large applications and operating systems, so you’ll always have access to the most accurate and up-to-date locale data.

CLDR content

Globalize needs CLDR content to function properly, although it doesn’t embed or host such content. Instead, Globalize empowers developers to load CLDR data the way they want. Vanilla CLDR in its official JSON format (no pre-processing) is expected to be provided. As a consequence, (a) Globalize avoids bugs caused by outdated i18n content. Developers can use up-to-date CLDR data directly from Unicode as soon as it’s released, without having to wait for any pipeline on our side. (b) Developers have full control over which locale coverage they want to provide on their applications. (c) Developers are able to share the same i18n dataset between Globalize and other libraries that leverage CLDR. There’s no need for duplicating data. For more information read our documentation on CLDR Usage.

Browser and Node.js Support

Globalize is systematically tested against desktop and mobile browsers and Node.js. So, using it you’ll get consistent results across the various browsers and between client and server. For more details read our Browser Support section.

Get Started

Install it and use it today. See examples for AMD + bower, or Node.js + npm, or plain JavaScript in our Usage section.

If you’re coming from Globalize 0.x, don’t panic. We’ve created a migration guide for you.

Team and Community

We’re grateful for all the support we have received, specifically from Jörn Zaefferer and Scott González for their help with the initial rewrite concept and for being constant advisors; John Emmons, Steven R. Loomis, and Mark Davis (Unicode) for their help with CLDR and UTS#35 specification questions; Alex Sexton and Eemeli Aro for their messageformat.js and make-plural.js libraries that power respectively our MessageFormat and Plural modules; and the jQuery Foundation for the community building, collaborative efforts and its continued support of Globalize and web internationalization.

We want to also thank Nebojša Ćirić, Mihai Niță, and Shanjian Li (Google); Steven Loomis, Steven Atkin, and John Emmons (IBM); Rick Waldron (Ecma-402 2nd Edition editor); Caridy Patiño and Eric Ferraiuolo (Yahoo); Christophe Jolif and Clement Mathieu (Dojo); Cameron Dutro and Kirill Lashuk (Twitter); Craig Cummings and Tex Texin (jsi18n.com); Santhosh Thottingal and Kartik Mistry (Wikipedia); Axel Hecht (Mozilla); Bruno Lewin and Daniel Goldschmidt (Microsoft); Lily Wen (Adobe); Edwin Hoogerbeets (LG); Eirik Rude (Oracle); Xiang Xu (Paypal); Iskren Chernev (moment.js); and Tingan Ho (l10ns.org) to have joined us in an effort to better coordinate the globalization (internationalization and localization) activity of the JavaScript community. If you want to get involved or read more about it, head over to the [email protected] mailing list or take a look at our JavaScript Globalization overview page.

Upcoming

We’re working on even more exciting features that will soon be part of Globalize. To name a few: runtime optimization and non-gregorian calendar support. So, if any of these are of your interest, make sure you chime in. Express your thoughts and your needs (e.g., which calendars you want to be supported).
We are always looking for contributors to join our team. If you want to get involved, please read the contributing guide. Your help is very welcome.

Announcing PEP 0.3.0

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Today, we’re happy to announce the first release of PEP (jQuery Foundation’s Pointer Events polyfill) since Google transferred the Pointer Events polyfill to the jQuery Foundation. There’s more work to do in order to address changes to the Pointer Events specification and flesh out our test suite, but you can start using Pointer Events in your projects today! Other projects, like jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, and Dojo are in the process of switching to Pointer Events with PEP.

To celebrate our first release, Alex Schmitz built a little demo which he used to show PEP working on different devices.

P drawn on desktop ChromeE drawn in Chrome on AndroidP drawn in Mobile Safari

Since the transfer, we’ve been focusing on moving over to new infrastructure to allow easier contributions and faster development. We’ve switched the tests over to using Intern and set up continuous integration with Travis CI, using BrowserStack to run the tests in all of our supported browsers. We’ve also switched away from plain file concatenation to using ES6 modules via Esperanto to make the cross-file dependencies explicit. Lastly, we’ve moved to our common release infrastructure to ensure consistent releases.

To get started with PEP, you can get the files from npm, bower (pepjs), the jQuery CDN, or the GitHub release. Check out the samples or view the project README for more details. If you run into any issues using PEP, please file an issue or join us on IRC in #pep on freenode.

Come help the jQuery Foundation

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For many years now the jQuery team first, and then the jQuery Foundation as an organization, has helped developers all over the world to write simple, concise, and clean code that isn’t affected by all the browser incompatibilities that developers are well-accustomed to. As you know, all the jQuery Foundation projects are maintained by a group of volunteers who keep the libraries relevant and in line with modern browser APIs and issues. The team also keeps the API documentation and educational guides up to date.

In the next few months, the team will work on the several jQuery-related websites to ensure an even higher standard of quality to help millions of users write their code. There is so much to do and our resources are limited, so today we are asking you for help. Part of the team is currently focusing their attention on the Learning Center, but we appreciate help in any repository. If ever the jQuery Foundation projects have saved you work and frustration, this is the right time to give something back. There are many ways in which you can contribute, and you don’t have to be an expert developer. You can help the project by fixing issues in the code or improving the documentation. Everything counts. The jQuery Foundation welcomes contributions from anyone willing to put in the time and effort to help us and our community of users.

To learn more about how you can contribute, visit the Contribute website, sign our Contributor License Agreement and start helping. In case you can’t help us by addressing code or documentation problems but you still love our projects, you can help us by making a small donation.

Esprima 2.1 Released

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We’ve just released Esprima 2.1.0! This release introduces support for several new pieces of ES6 syntax: Classes, Rest Parameters, Computed Property Names, let and const. See the release notes below for full details. We’ve also made various improvements to our testing infrastructure to make the codebase more contributor friendly. A big thank you to all those who contributed patches to this release: Ariya Hidayat, Bei Zhang, Brandon Mills, Mike Rennie, Mike Sherov.

While working on bringing more ES6 features to Esprima, we began collaborating with other JavaScript parsers and parser consumers to help define a community standard for JS AST generation. The result of that effort is the ESTree spec, located here: https://github.com/estree/estree. We wanted to say thank you to all who are contributing, which includes members from Esprima, the Mozilla SpiderMonkey parser, the Acorn parser, and Babel, to name a few. A full list of contributors is located here: https://github.com/estree/estree/blob/master/README.md

Expect a 2.2 release to follow in a few weeks bringing even more ES6 support. If you’d like to help contribute, we hang out in the #esprima room on Freenode IRC, and have a weekly meeting at 2PM ET on Wednesdays in #esprima-meeting on Freenode IRC as well. We look forward to seeing you there!

Release Notes

  • Support ES6 class #1001
  • Support ES6 rest parameter #1011
  • Support ES6 computed property name #1037
  • Support ES6 lexical declaration #1065
  • Expand the location of property getter, setter, and methods #1029
  • Enable TryStatement transition to a single handler #1031
  • Tolerate unclosed block comment #1041

Getting on Point

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We’re excited to announce that the Pointer Events specification has become a W3C Recommendation! As we’ve said before, we love Pointer Events because they support all of the common input devices today – mouse, pen/stylus, and fingers – but they’re also designed in such a way that future devices can easily be added, and existing code will automatically support the new device. While reaching Recommendation status is a monumental moment, there’s still much work to do.

Pointer Events aren’t a viable solution until they’re usable in all of the browsers that developers are supporting. While that day may seem far away, the jQuery Foundation is dedicated to getting usable Pointer Events in every developer’s hands as soon as possible. We’re working on PEP, our Pointer Events polyfill that Google transferred from the Polymer project to the jQuery Foundation. PEP will be integrated into projects such as jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, and Dojo. We’re hoping to get out our first release in the next few weeks. If you’re interested in helping out, let us know.

Microsoft is already shipping a full implementation of Pointer Events in IE11 and they had a mostly complete, prefixed implementation in IE10. Mozilla also has a full implementation for Firefox on Windows Metro, though it’s not currently enabled. Both implementation are passing 100% of the W3C Pointer Events test suite. You can follow Mozilla’s progress for all of their supported platforms on https://wiki.mozilla.org/Gecko/Touch.

Of course, the world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows. There’s still no sign that Apple will ever implement Pointer Events. Because of this, Google has decided not to ship Pointer Events in Blink, but rather to try to extend Touch Events to have the power of Pointer Events. The work to extend Touch Events is happening in the Touch Events Community Group to ensure interoperability and standardization. However, there is reasonable concern that adding several extensions to Touch Events will just result in an even more fragmented landscape, eventually worsening the situation rather than improving it. It’s not clear that Apple would implement all of these features anyway, and adding support for hover would require awkward APIs due to the logic that already exists in Touch Events. Even if the power of Pointer Events were added to Touch Events, the awkward event interface isn’t nearly as nice or easy to transition to from Mouse Events.

Despite Google’s current position, they’re willing to continually re-evaluate if shipping Pointer Events will help move the web forward. We’re hopeful that Google will reverse their decision in the future and Apple will eventually be compelled to implement Pointer Events once Safari is the only major browser without support. The Chromium issue for implementing Pointer Events is already in the the 99th percentile of all issues (open and closed) based on number of stars.

As a community, we can shape the future of the web right now. We need to stop letting Apple stifle the work of browser vendors and standards bodies. Too many times, we’ve seen browser vendors with the best intentions fall victim to Apple’s reluctance to work with standards bodies and WebKit’s dominance on mobile devices. We cannot let this continue to happen. The jQuery Foundation is dedicated to driving standards, like Pointer Events, to improve the developer experience and in turn, make the web a better, more accessible place for everyone. Together, we can push the web forward and let standards and better APIs win. We can choose Pointer Events over Touch Events. And we can do it right now, with PEP.