jQuery Summit – Nov. 19th

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jQuery Summit

Environments for Humans is running a one-day, online conference focusing on jQuery. The conference will be on November 19th and will feature a number of prominent members of the jQuery community, including members of the jQuery team.

The following talks are slated for the jQuery Summit:

  • The State of jQuery – John Resig
  • Web Interface Essentials – Marc Grabanski
  • RIAs: Building for the Desktop with the Web – Jonathan Snook
  • Rich Interactivity, Simplified, with jQuery UI – Richard Worth
  • Refactoring jQuery – Jonathan Sharp
  • JavaScript for Designers – David McFarland
  • Building Robust jQuery Plugins – Jörn Zaefferer
  • jQuery Anti-Patterns for Performance & Compression – Paul Irish

While a number of these talks are reprisals from the recent jQuery conference, this event is not being run by the jQuery project. That being said, it looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun, and we encourage those that missed the conference in September to check it out.

All attendees will be receiving a free copy of the upcoming jQuery Cookbook, from O’Reilly. Additionally a number of prizes will be given away to attendees (books, DVDs, etc.).

Register for the jQuery Summit

There is a ticket discount in effect until October 30th. Additionally, if you register and use the discount code JQRYRESIGJ you’ll save an extra 10% off the overall price. A portion of the proceeds will be coming back to help fund the project.

code.jquery.com Redirected to Google Ajax APIs

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Starting at 10PM MT on August 20th, code.jquery.com will start redirecting (301) to ajax.googleapis.com [http://code.google.com/apis/ajaxlibs/documentation/index.html#jquery].

Immediate Impact:

Long Term:

Full documentation of Google’s Ajax API are available at http://code.google.com/apis/ajaxlibs/documentation/index.html#jquery. Continue reading

Fall 2009 jQuery Talks

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Reminder: While the upcoming jQuery Conference is already sold out, we’re still looking for some excellent talks. We’re accepting talk proposals until the 15th. If your talk is accepted your ticket fee will be waived.

Even if you can’t make the jQuery Conference, though, there are a number of opportunities to meet members of the jQuery team, hear talks about jQuery, or generally mingle with other jQuery users coming up in the next couple months. If you happen to know of any other talks or events please comment below and we’ll add them.

jQuery Conference 2009: Dates and Venue

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UPDATE: Registration is now open! Register here: http://events.jquery.com/

Good news everybody! The dates and venue for this year’s jQuery Conference have been determined.

The conference will be held September 12th and 13th at Microsoft Cambridge in Boston, MA.

This will be a 2 day conference with multiple tracks on each day. We’re in the process of planning out the schedule, talking with speakers, and setting up the conference web site.

Watch the jQuery blog or jQuery Twitter feed for notification when registration opens.

While this venue is larger than those that we’ve had in the past (Harvard Law School in ’07 and the MIT Stata Center in ’08) we do expect to sell out all the available seats, as has happened every year so far. That being said, the venue is quite incredible, easily one of the best spaces available for a conference:

A brief synopsis of some of the content that you’ll be able to expect:

The annual conference of jQuery users and developers. There will be talks on jQuery, jQuery UI, plugins, complex application development, and more – all from the top jQuery developers. Case studies from some of the leading users of jQuery will be included along with a 3 hour tutorial for those just getting started.

You can see the schedules from past jQuery conferences here: 2008, 2007. There will be a nominal fee (likely around $100-$150) to help us cover to cost of food for both days and shirts.

Looking forward to seeing everyone in Boston this fall!

Note: If you are interested in sponsoring the conference, please contact John Resig.

Update: There have been a lot of questions asking if there will be a conference on the west coast (San Francisco) or in Europe. While we don’t have any immediate plans to hold conferences in those locations, this year, we would like to hold them in the future. In the meantime I recommend checking out Full Frontal (UK, November) and Fronteers (Amsterdam, November) – both of which should shape up to be excellent JavaScript conferences.

Update: Thanks to Jeff for adding the event to Upcoming.

jQuery UI 1.6rc6: Help us test!

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jQuery UI 1.6rc6 is available.

Download jQuery UI 1.6rc6
You can download the entire development bundle directly at

http://jquery-ui.googlecode.com/files/jquery.ui-1.6rc6.zip

This includes a default theme, as well as all the test and demo files. Or you can create a customized download of individual components

http://jqueryui.com/download/

and a custom theme at

http://jqueryui.com/themeroller

This is the final step before releasing 1.6 final tomorrow (Saturday night). Since we only have two days, we really need you help us test if there are no major blockers left we might have overseen. Please create a ticket for any issue you find on the jQuery UI bug tracker:

http://dev.jqueryui.com/ (note: requires registration)

and send a note for discussion on the jQuery UI Development mailing list as well:

http://groups.google.com/group/jquery-ui-dev

Thanks everyone, prepare for a great weekend!

jQuery Meetup in San Francisco

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There are a few jQuery guys in San Francisco this week and we thought it’d be fun to have a meetup. John Resig (Creator of jQuery), Rey Bango (Head of jQuery Evangelism Team) and Yehuda Katz (Rails Core Contributor, jQuery Team Member) will all be meeting up tomorrow night (the 29th) if you want to say ‘hi’.

More information can be found on the Upcoming.org site for the event – feel free to add yourself if you’re interested in coming:
jQuery(“#drinks”).imbibe();

jQuery 1.3.1 Released

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Welcome Digg users! You may be interested in the full jQuery 1.3 release, which just happened on the 14th. Enjoy!


This is a bug fix release for jQuery 1.3. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.

There are no significant changes in 1.3.1 from 1.3 other than straight bug fixes. If you are still using jQuery 1.2.6, and looking to upgrade, please upgrade directly to this release.

Downloading

A copy of jQuery 1.3.1 is also available on Google’s CDN (feel free to copy the URL directly into your site):

If you wish to checkout the full release from the Subversion repository, you can do so by following the following instructions and checking out the source from the following location:

svn co http://jqueryjs.googlecode.com/svn/tags/1.3.1

A couple quick housekeeping notes:

Some noted in the release notes for 1.3 that we missed testing on Firefox 2, even though we still support it. This was a mistake on our part: We still support Firefox 2 and test on it prior to releases. You can see the full test suite run below.

jQuery 1.3.1

It was also noted that Safari 2 didn’t show up in the list of browsers that we tested against prior to the 1.3 release. This is correct – we are phasing out support for Safari 2 in jQuery. Considering that Safari 2 shows no appreciable market share and has been superseded by 3 separate Safari releases (3.0, 3.1, and 3.2) we no longer see a need for significant testing against that release.

Finally, a few users noticed that we no longer provide a “packed” version of jQuery (a version of jQuery run through Dean Edwards’ Packer with Base62 encoding turned on). We did this for a couple reasons:

  • Packed scripts are significantly harder to debug (even harder than minifed scripts).
  • Packed scripts aren’t able to run on all platforms without issue (such as Adobe AIR and Caja-capable environments).
  • But most importantly: Packed scripts are slower for the user than what you would get from using just minification. This may seem counter-intuitive since a packed script’s file size is smaller than a minified script but the final load time ends up being much higher (due to the decompression step it must go through). We have some data regarding the loading performance of minified scripts vs. packed scripts, for those that are interested.

The minifed copy of jQuery that we provide, run through the YUI Compressor, should be the optimal form of jQuery to use in a production environment (served using gzipping, if possible).