jQuery 1.2.2: 2nd Birthday Present

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On the 2nd anniversary of jQuery’s release we’re proud to bring you a brand new release of jQuery. This is primarily a bug fix release for jQuery 1.2. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.

Downloading

jQuery 1.2.2:

If you wish to checkout the full release from the Subversion repository, you can do so by following the following instructions and checking out the source from the following location:

svn co http://jqueryjs.googlecode.com/svn/tags/1.2.2

Important Changes

A lot of hard work was put into this release by Brandon Aaron and David Serduke. David is a new addition to the jQuery core development team and has been making significant contributions – please help us in welcoming him!

Primarily, this has been a bug fix and optimization release. We landed over 120 bug fixes and our test suite now has over 1157 tests in it – which we are quire proud of.

300% Speed Improvements to $(DOMElement)

Once again, we’ve taken a step at micro-improving the most-used features in jQuery. Specifically, the use of passing a DOM element into the jQuery function. (Most frequently used when you see stuff like $(this) in your code.)

Here’s a quick peak at some of the speed jumps that you can expect in all the major browsers:

Browser 1.2.1 (ms) 1.2.2 (ms)
Firefox 2 0.041 0.015
Firefox 3 0.033 0.01
Safari 3 0.017 0.005
Opera 9 0.023 0.004
Internet Explorer 6 0.04 0.03

.ready() Overhaul

The document ready function has been long due for some extra love. We’ve made a number of specific changes.

* Internet Explorer document ready drastically improved. We use a new technique inspired by Diego Perini. It allows us to not have to do a document.write() anymore, which is really fantastic.
* All browsers now wait for CSS to be ready, in addition to just the DOM. In reality, it’s not just a vanilla document ready anymore – but we found that users, overwhelmingly, needed to wait for document styling to be active (such as knowing if an element is visible, or what its height is). Specifically we’ve added improvements to Safari and Opera to make this possible.
* $(document).bind("ready", fn); – You can now watch for the document ready event via the traditional .bind() function. Of course, .ready() still works as you would expect it to.

.bind(“mouseenter”) / .bind(“mouseleave”)

The functionality that was the core of the .hover() function has been split out into two new cross-browser events: mouseenter and mouseleave. These are different from mouseover and mouseout as those events will fire as you move in and out of child elements (which is generally not desired). For example, the following are both valid and work perfectly in jQuery 1.2.2:

$("li").hover(function(){
  $(this).addClass("hover");
}, function(){
  $(this).removeClass("hover");
});
$("li").bind("mouseenter", function(){
  $(this).addClass("hover");
}).bind("mouseleave", function(){
  $(this).removeClass("hover");
});

.bind(“mousewheel”)

We have a new plugin, written by Brandon Aaron, based on the new Event API which adds mousewheel event support to jQuery core. This will allow you to write things like:

$("div").bind("mousewheel", function(event, delta){
  if ( delta < 0 )
    $(this).append("up");
  else
    $(this).append("down");
});

Complex :not()

Even though it's not part of the CSS 3 specification it's been a common feature request - so you can now do complex expressions in your :not() selectors. For example, the following now work:

$(".hover:not(li.active)")
$("li:not(.active,.hover,:contains(test))")

Accept Headers

For normal jQuery Ajax operations we now send an extra Accept header to let the server know what kind of content we're looking for. If you specify a dataType argument then we'll take care of all the header setting for you. We currently send the following headers for each dataType.

  • xml "application/xml, text/xml"
  • html "text/html"
  • script "text/javascript, application/javascript"
  • json "application/json, text/javascript"
  • text "text/plain"
  • Everything else: "*/*"

Bug Fixes

Here's a sampling of some of the functionality that's seen some important overhauling.

* .clone() overhaul
* Script evaluation overhaul
* height() / width() overhaul
* Cross-frame DOM manipulation
* A few memory leaks have been resolved

Event API

There's a new API for dealing with events. You can now create your own custom event types (with custom ways of being set up and torn down). Effectively, it allows you to go beyond simple event triggering and create a full scheme for attaching, handling, and tearing down events on an element. A demonstration plugin was created by Brandon Aaron that you can use to learn the powerful new API.

jQuery 1.2.2 Released

Posted on by

This is a bug fix release for jQuery 1.2. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.

Downloading

jQuery 1.2.2:

Important Changes

A lot of hard work was put into this release by Brandon Aaron and David Serduke. David is a new addition to the jQuery core development team and has been making significant contributions – please help us in welcoming him!

Primarily, this has been a bug fix and optimization release. We landed over 120 bug fixes and our test suite now has over 1157 tests in it – which we are quite proud of.

300% Speed Improvements to $(DOMElement)

Once again, we’ve taken a step at micro-improving the most-used features in jQuery. Specifically, the use of passing a DOM element into the jQuery function. (Most frequently used when you see stuff like $(this) in your code.)

Here’s a quick peek at some of the speed jumps that you can expect in all the major browsers:

Browser 1.2.1 (ms) 1.2.2 (ms)
Firefox 2 0.041 0.015
Firefox 3 0.033 0.01
Safari 3 0.017 0.005
Opera 9 0.023 0.004
Internet Explorer 6 0.04 0.03

.ready() Overhaul

The document ready function has been long due for some extra love. We’ve made a number of specific changes.

  • Internet Explorer document ready drastically improved. We use a new technique inspired by Diego Perini. It allows us to not have to do a document.write() anymore, which is really fantastic.
  • All browsers now wait for CSS to be ready, in addition to just the DOM. In reality, it’s not just a vanilla document ready anymore – but we found that users, overwhelmingly, needed to wait for document styling to be active (such as knowing if an element is visible, or what its height is). Specifically we’ve added improvements to Safari and Opera to make this possible.
  • $(document).bind("ready", fn); – You can now watch for the document ready event via the traditional .bind() function. Of course, .ready() still works as you would expect it to.

.bind(“mouseenter”) / .bind(“mouseleave”)

The functionality that was the core of the .hover() function has been split out into two new cross-browser events: mouseenter and mouseleave. These are different from mouseover and mouseout as those events will fire as you move in and out of child elements (which is generally not desired). For example, the following are both valid and work perfectly in jQuery 1.2.2:

$("li").hover(function(){
  $(this).addClass("hover");
}, function(){
  $(this).removeClass("hover");
});
$("li").bind("mouseenter", function(){
  $(this).addClass("hover");
}).bind("mouseleave", function(){
  $(this).removeClass("hover");
});

.bind(“mousewheel”)

We have [http://dev.jquery.com/browser/trunk/plugins/mousewheel/jquery.mousewheel.js a new plugin], written by Brandon Aaron, based on the new Event API which adds mousewheel event support to jQuery core. This will allow you to write things like:

$("div").bind("mousewheel", function(event, delta){
  if ( delta < 0 )
    $(this).append("up");
  else
    $(this).append("down");
});

Complex :not()

Even though it's not part of the CSS 3 specification it's been a common feature request - so you can now do complex expressions in your :not() selectors. For example, the following now work:

$(".hover:not(li.active)")
$("li:not(.active,.hover,:contains(test))")

Accept Headers

For normal jQuery Ajax operations we now send an extra Accept header to let the server know what kind of content we're looking for. If you specify a dataType argument then we'll take care of all the header setting for you. We currently send the following headers for each dataType.

  • xml "application/xml, text/xml"
  • html "text/html"
  • script "text/javascript, application/javascript"
  • json "application/json, text/javascript"
  • text "text/plain"
  • Everything else: "*/*"

Bug Fixes

Here's a sampling of some of the functionality that's seen some important overhauling.

  • .clone() overhaul
  • Script evaluation overhaul
  • height() / width() overhaul
  • Cross-frame DOM manipulation
  • A few memory leaks have been resolved

Event API

There's a new API for dealing with events. You can now create your own custom event types (with custom ways of being set up and torn down). Effectively, it allows you to go beyond simple event triggering and create a full scheme for attaching, handling, and tearing down events on an element. A [http://dev.jquery.com/browser/trunk/plugins/mousewheel/jquery.mousewheel.js demonstration plugin] was created by Brandon Aaron that you can use to learn the powerful new API.

Google Using jQuery

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Google relaunched their Google Code site with a new design and, you guessed it, jQuery under the hood! Dion Almaer, employee at Google and co-founder of Ajaxian.com, discusses the redesign on his blog and makes mention to the fact that the Google team is now using jQuery for the Google Code site. DeWitt Clinton also discusses this on the Google Code Blog:

For example, the search results pages use a combination of the AJAX Search API and Custom Search Engines. The homepage gadgets use the AJAX Feed API and Google Reader feeds. The videos are powered by the YouTube API, the blogs by the Blogger API, the events powered by the Google Calendar API, the metrics by Google Analytics, the forums by Google Groups, etc., etc.. And we’re pleased to use jQuery, the wonderful open source JavaScript library (not ours, we’re just fans), to help power each page. Stay tuned — over the upcoming weeks we’ll offer detailed articles and tutorials about how we built the various parts of Google Code using open technologies.

As pioneers in the Ajax and JavaScript space, it’s extremely exciting to have Google use jQuery to help them build out this site and we look forward to helping the Google team in the future.

jQuery in Action (Get 30% Off!)

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Hey guys,

As many of you already know, I have been working on jQuery in Action, a book on jQuery for Manning Publishers.

Almost the entire book is available on MEAP (Manning Early Access Program), and it's going to be published in December of this year.

The book itself is pretty awesome. It tries to give you the information you need with a useful narrative, including motivation for certain parts of jQuery. One of the greatest things about the book, in my humble opinion, are the labs, which allow you to test out parts of jQuery without having to throw together an entire test case. For instance, there's a selector lab, which lets you see, visually, which elements will be selected by a given jQuery selector, and a drag/drop lab, which lets you test drag options via radio buttons and then see the results in action quickly.

It's currently the only book out that covers jQuery 1.2, as well as the important parts of jQuery UI (including stuff like the undocumented callback object that you get in the draggable/droppable primitives). Toward the end of the book, you get full-chapter examples (my favorite is the Ajax chapter, which covers building an Ajaxified store selling boots ;) ), and focuses heavily on jQuery best practices and Unobtrusive Scripting.

The book itself is very much in the spirit of jQuery: short and to the point, while covering the important background material necessary to fully understand the topics at hand (especially non-trivial topics like event binding and Ajax).

Without further ado, you can purchase the book (you'll get the prerelease stuff now and the complete book when it's released in December) at Manning's Site. If you use the coupon code JQM30 before the end of October, you will also receive a 30% discount.

jQuery UI: Interactions and Widgets

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Meet the jQuery UI team at jQueryCamp Boston!

We’re having a free one day conference this October and most of the jQuery, and jQuery UI, teams will be there. Come along, ask questions, and meet the people who build the library that you love!

User Interface - Green

Today we’re very pleased to announce a brand new library: jQuery UI. jQuery UI is a fully themed interaction and widget library built on top of jQuery.

You’ll be able to find everything that you need to know about jQuery UI on it’s site:

http://ui.jquery.com/

jQuery UI signals the start of a whole new branch of the jQuery project which will focus on developing high-quality, reusable, components that you’ll be able to drop in your applications. Frequently, these components are coming directly to you from traditional jQuery plugins, but with strict coding, documentation, themeing, and demo standards. We hope you’ll enjoy this new level of quality as much as we do.

We’re launching with one complete theme: Flora (designed by Tom) and two partially-complete themes: Light and Dark (by Sean). Within the next week we’re going to be announcing the details of a new theming competition, along with everything that you need to completely build your own jQuery UI theme.

Note: jQuery UI requires that you use, at least, jQuery 1.2.1 or newer.

Please be kind, there’s still going to be a mess of rough edges, as is to be expected with a brand new project. Please submit bugs to the bug tracker under the “UI” component and bring them up for discussion on the jQuery UI Mailing List. We appreciate your help.

Without further ado, here’s jQuery UI!

Demo App: Advanced Image Gallery

(Currently has issues in IE and Safari – we’re working on some fixes which should be up later today.)

Demo App: Bar Chart Navigation

(Currently only works in browsers that have Canvas support: Firefox, Safari, and Opera.)

Features: Mouse Interaction

Draggables (Docs)

Droppables (Docs)

Sortables (Docs)

Selectables (Docs)

Resizables (Docs)

Features: Widgets

Accordion (Docs)

Calendar (Docs)

Dialog (Docs)

Slider (Docs)

Tablesorter (Docs)

Tabs (Docs)

Features: Effects

Magnifier (Docs)

Shadow (Docs)

Contributors

This is the result of many months of work by over a dozen people – many of whom were first time contributors to jQuery.

For now, here’s a rough list of everyone who helped, and what they helped with. (Please let me know if I forgot anyone!)

  • Paul B (Draggables, Droppables, Sortables, Resizables, Slider, Shadow, Magnifier, Gallery App)
  • John (Documentation, Theming, Demos, UI Site, Cat Herding)
  • Richard (Tree, Selectables, Sortables, Dialog, many bug fixes)
  • Tom (Flora theme, UI Site, and UI logo)
  • Sean (Theming, Dark and Light themes, Shadow, Forms)
  • Klaus (Tabs)
  • Joern (Accordion)
  • Christian (Tablesorter)
  • Adel (Downloader, Client-Side)
  • Paul H (Downloader, Server-Side)
  • Marc (Calendar)

With additional help from: Tane, Micheil, Gilles, Dmitri, and Yehuda. Much of their work will be seen in the next release of jQuery UI (including menus, toolbars, uploaders, splitters, and rich text editors).

I’d like to do a more-detailed write up of what everyone put into this project to thank everyone individually, as everyone did a really fantastic job of pulling together and making this happen. Paul, Tom, Richard, and Sean, especially – you guys did a superb job!

Once again, I hope everyone enjoys this new work – please be kind, it’s still got some very rough edges, so to speak. If you spot any bugs, please post them to the bug tracker under the “UI” component.

As always, feedback is appreciated! If you’d like to let us know what you think, please post to the jQuery UI Mailing List, or hop on irc.freenode.net #jquery-ui, as those are the best place to be able to find us.

Enjoy!

If you like what you see, feel free to give it a digg.

jQuery 1.2.1: Quick Fixes for 1.2

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jQuery 1.2.1 is a bug fix release for jQuery 1.2. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.


Downloading

jQuery 1.2.1:

If you wish to checkout the full release from the Subversion repository, you can do so by following the following instructions and checking out the source from the following location:

 svn co http://jqueryjs.googlecode.com/svn/tags/1.2.1


Important Changes


Relative Animations

There was a serious error in the API for the new relative animations that caused a conflict with existing animation styles. To resolve this, in order to do a relative animation, you must now use the following syntax:

 $(...).animate({ height: "+=50px", width: "-=20%", fontSize: "+=2em" });

With += meaning “Add to the current position” and -= meaning “Take away from the current position”.


.eq()

Due to some very-persuasive arguments, and a great deal of reconsideration, .eq() has been brought back. A great number of plugins rely on this single method – and the alternative provided by .slice() simply wasn’t as elegant a solution as what was originally provided.

jQuery 1.2.1 Released

Posted on by

This is a bug fix release for jQuery 1.2. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.

Downloading

jQuery Minified (14kb with gzipping)
jQuery Packed (26kb)
Regular (77kb)

Important Changes

Relative Animations

There was a serious error in the API for the new relative animations that caused a conflict with existing animation styles. To resolve this, in order to do a relative animation, you must now use the following syntax:
$(...).animate({ height: "+=50px", width: "-=20%", fontSize: "+=2em" });

With += meaning “Add to the current position” and -= meaning “Take away from the current position”.

.eq()

Due to some very-persuasive arguments, and a great deal of reconsideration, .eq() has been brought back. A great number of plugins rely on this single method – and the alternative provided by .slice() simply wasn’t as elegant a solution as what was originally provided.

jQuery 1.2: jQuery.extend(“Awesome”)

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Attend jQueryCamp Boston!

We’re having a free one day conference this October and most of the jQuery team will be there. Come along, ask questions, and meet the people who build the library that you love!

This is a massive new release of jQuery that’s been a long time in the making – and it’s ready for your consumption!

We’ve put the full jQuery 1.2 release notes on a page of it’s own, since there’s so much to dig through. REMEMBER, features were removed in 1.2, so please be sure to read the notes on how to upgrade before doing so.

As always, there’s going to be bugs, so please submit them to the bug tracker and we’ll try to get them sorted out, right away. You can probably expect a minor bug fix release within the week to take care of any pressing issues.

jQuery 1.2 (Full Release Notes)

Download

jQuery 1.2: (How To Upgrade)

Plugins:

New Features

  • Selectors

    •  :has(selector)
    •  :header
    •  :animated
    • XPath Selector Plugin
  • Attributes
    • .val() Overhaul
  • Traversing
    • .map()
    • .prevAll() / .nextAll()
    • .slice()
    • .hasClass()
    • .andSelf()
    • .contents()
  • Manipulation
    • .wrapInner() / .wrapAll()
    • .replaceWith() / .replaceAll()
    • Event Cloning
  • CSS
    • .offset()
    • .height() / .width() for document and window
  • Ajax

    • Partial .load()
    • Cross-Domain getScript
    • JSONP
    • .serialize() Overhaul
    • Disable Caching
  • Effects
    • .stop()
    • %/em Animations
    • Color Animations
    • Relative Animations
    • Queue Control
    •  :animated
    • step: Function
  • Events
    • Namespaced Events
    • .triggerHandler()
  • Internals
    • Documentation Move
    • Expando Management


Sunday, Sunday, Sunday!

This Sunday, September 16th, the brand new jQuery UI is coming to your town. Draggables, droppables, resizables, shadows, sliders, sortables, tabs, accordions, selectables, trees, and modals. All completely documented, demoed, themed, and 100% Free Open Source Software.

To whet your appetite, here’s quick peak at what you can look forward to:

Sexy jQuery UI

Feel free to Digg this post.