jQuery Summit – Nov. 19th

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jQuery Summit

Environments for Humans is running a one-day, online conference focusing on jQuery. The conference will be on November 19th and will feature a number of prominent members of the jQuery community, including members of the jQuery team.

The following talks are slated for the jQuery Summit:

  • The State of jQuery – John Resig
  • Web Interface Essentials – Marc Grabanski
  • RIAs: Building for the Desktop with the Web – Jonathan Snook
  • Rich Interactivity, Simplified, with jQuery UI – Richard Worth
  • Refactoring jQuery – Jonathan Sharp
  • JavaScript for Designers – David McFarland
  • Building Robust jQuery Plugins – Jörn Zaefferer
  • jQuery Anti-Patterns for Performance & Compression – Paul Irish

While a number of these talks are reprisals from the recent jQuery conference, this event is not being run by the jQuery project. That being said, it looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun, and we encourage those that missed the conference in September to check it out.

All attendees will be receiving a free copy of the upcoming jQuery Cookbook, from O’Reilly. Additionally a number of prizes will be given away to attendees (books, DVDs, etc.).

Register for the jQuery Summit

There is a ticket discount in effect until October 30th. Additionally, if you register and use the discount code JQRYRESIGJ you’ll save an extra 10% off the overall price. A portion of the proceeds will be coming back to help fund the project.

code.jquery.com Redirected to Google Ajax APIs

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Starting at 10PM MT on August 20th, code.jquery.com will start redirecting (301) to ajax.googleapis.com [http://code.google.com/apis/ajaxlibs/documentation/index.html#jquery].

Immediate Impact:

Long Term:

Full documentation of Google’s Ajax API are available at http://code.google.com/apis/ajaxlibs/documentation/index.html#jquery. Continue reading

Fall 2009 jQuery Talks

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Reminder: While the upcoming jQuery Conference is already sold out, we’re still looking for some excellent talks. We’re accepting talk proposals until the 15th. If your talk is accepted your ticket fee will be waived.

Even if you can’t make the jQuery Conference, though, there are a number of opportunities to meet members of the jQuery team, hear talks about jQuery, or generally mingle with other jQuery users coming up in the next couple months. If you happen to know of any other talks or events please comment below and we’ll add them.

jQuery Conference 2009: Dates and Venue

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UPDATE: Registration is now open! Register here: http://events.jquery.com/

Good news everybody! The dates and venue for this year’s jQuery Conference have been determined.

The conference will be held September 12th and 13th at Microsoft Cambridge in Boston, MA.

This will be a 2 day conference with multiple tracks on each day. We’re in the process of planning out the schedule, talking with speakers, and setting up the conference web site.

Watch the jQuery blog or jQuery Twitter feed for notification when registration opens.

While this venue is larger than those that we’ve had in the past (Harvard Law School in ’07 and the MIT Stata Center in ’08) we do expect to sell out all the available seats, as has happened every year so far. That being said, the venue is quite incredible, easily one of the best spaces available for a conference:

A brief synopsis of some of the content that you’ll be able to expect:

The annual conference of jQuery users and developers. There will be talks on jQuery, jQuery UI, plugins, complex application development, and more – all from the top jQuery developers. Case studies from some of the leading users of jQuery will be included along with a 3 hour tutorial for those just getting started.

You can see the schedules from past jQuery conferences here: 2008, 2007. There will be a nominal fee (likely around $100-$150) to help us cover to cost of food for both days and shirts.

Looking forward to seeing everyone in Boston this fall!

Note: If you are interested in sponsoring the conference, please contact John Resig.

Update: There have been a lot of questions asking if there will be a conference on the west coast (San Francisco) or in Europe. While we don’t have any immediate plans to hold conferences in those locations, this year, we would like to hold them in the future. In the meantime I recommend checking out Full Frontal (UK, November) and Fronteers (Amsterdam, November) – both of which should shape up to be excellent JavaScript conferences.

Update: Thanks to Jeff for adding the event to Upcoming.

jQuery UI 1.6rc6: Help us test!

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jQuery UI 1.6rc6 is available.

Download jQuery UI 1.6rc6
You can download the entire development bundle directly at

http://jquery-ui.googlecode.com/files/jquery.ui-1.6rc6.zip

This includes a default theme, as well as all the test and demo files. Or you can create a customized download of individual components

http://jqueryui.com/download/

and a custom theme at

http://jqueryui.com/themeroller

This is the final step before releasing 1.6 final tomorrow (Saturday night). Since we only have two days, we really need you help us test if there are no major blockers left we might have overseen. Please create a ticket for any issue you find on the jQuery UI bug tracker:

http://dev.jqueryui.com/ (note: requires registration)

and send a note for discussion on the jQuery UI Development mailing list as well:

http://groups.google.com/group/jquery-ui-dev

Thanks everyone, prepare for a great weekend!

jQuery Meetup in San Francisco

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There are a few jQuery guys in San Francisco this week and we thought it’d be fun to have a meetup. John Resig (Creator of jQuery), Rey Bango (Head of jQuery Evangelism Team) and Yehuda Katz (Rails Core Contributor, jQuery Team Member) will all be meeting up tomorrow night (the 29th) if you want to say ‘hi’.

More information can be found on the Upcoming.org site for the event – feel free to add yourself if you’re interested in coming:
jQuery(“#drinks”).imbibe();

jQuery 1.3.1 Released

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Welcome Digg users! You may be interested in the full jQuery 1.3 release, which just happened on the 14th. Enjoy!


This is a bug fix release for jQuery 1.3. You can view the full list of what was fixed on the bug tracker.

There are no significant changes in 1.3.1 from 1.3 other than straight bug fixes. If you are still using jQuery 1.2.6, and looking to upgrade, please upgrade directly to this release.

Downloading

A copy of jQuery 1.3.1 is also available on Google’s CDN (feel free to copy the URL directly into your site):

If you wish to checkout the full release from the Subversion repository, you can do so by following the following instructions and checking out the source from the following location:

svn co http://jqueryjs.googlecode.com/svn/tags/1.3.1

A couple quick housekeeping notes:

Some noted in the release notes for 1.3 that we missed testing on Firefox 2, even though we still support it. This was a mistake on our part: We still support Firefox 2 and test on it prior to releases. You can see the full test suite run below.

jQuery 1.3.1

It was also noted that Safari 2 didn’t show up in the list of browsers that we tested against prior to the 1.3 release. This is correct – we are phasing out support for Safari 2 in jQuery. Considering that Safari 2 shows no appreciable market share and has been superseded by 3 separate Safari releases (3.0, 3.1, and 3.2) we no longer see a need for significant testing against that release.

Finally, a few users noticed that we no longer provide a “packed” version of jQuery (a version of jQuery run through Dean Edwards’ Packer with Base62 encoding turned on). We did this for a couple reasons:

  • Packed scripts are significantly harder to debug (even harder than minifed scripts).
  • Packed scripts aren’t able to run on all platforms without issue (such as Adobe AIR and Caja-capable environments).
  • But most importantly: Packed scripts are slower for the user than what you would get from using just minification. This may seem counter-intuitive since a packed script’s file size is smaller than a minified script but the final load time ends up being much higher (due to the decompression step it must go through). We have some data regarding the loading performance of minified scripts vs. packed scripts, for those that are interested.

The minifed copy of jQuery that we provide, run through the YUI Compressor, should be the optimal form of jQuery to use in a production environment (served using gzipping, if possible).

jQuery 1.3 and the jQuery Foundation

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Happy Birthday to jQuery! jQuery is three years old today, after being released way back on January 14th, 2006 at the first BarCampNYC by John Resig.

We have four announcements for you today, we hope you’ll enjoy them!

jQuery 1.3

First, we have an excellent new release of jQuery ready for you to enjoy. The big features of this release are:

  • Sizzle: A sizzlin’ hot CSS selector engine.
  • Live Events: Event delegation with a jQuery twist.
  • jQuery Event Overhaul: Completely rewired to simplify event handling.
  • HTML Injection Rewrite: Lightning-fast HTML appending.
  • Offset Rewrite: Super-quick position calculation.
  • No More Browser Sniffing: Using feature detection to help jQuery last for many more years to come.

The full details of the release can be found in the release notes:
http://docs.jquery.com/Release:jQuery_1.3

We’re currently planning on a follow-up jQuery 1.3.1 release sometime within the next week or two to catch any straggling bugs that might’ve slipped through. If you spot any bugs please be sure to submit them to the bug tracker.

Sizzle

jQuery has a brand new CSS selector engine – nicknamed ‘Sizzle‘. You can read the full details behind it in the jQuery 1.3 Release Notes (including performance numbers).

More importantly, though, we’re taking a big leap with Sizzle: We’re releasing it as a completely standalone project to be collaborated upon by many library creators and developers. We saw an opportunity to give something back to not just the jQuery community but to the JavaScript development community as a whole; and at the same time be able to collaborate with developers of other libraries on a single, unified, selector engine. We feel that there’s too much competition and not enough collaboration occurring and so we put our code out on the line as a good first step towards working together.

As a sign of good faith and willingness to collaborate, we’ve turned over Sizzle to the Dojo Foundation (an excellent non-profit well suited for this project, not to be confused with the Dojo Toolkit). We wanted a common meeting ground where all developers would be able to work together and under which there would be a clear long-term copyright holder.

Our request for collaboration has already seen an amazing resopnse: Developers from Prototype, Dojo, Yahoo UI, MochiKit, and TinyMCE (and many other projects) have all shown interest in refining Sizzle to perfection.

A rough Sizzle project page can be found here:
http://sizzlejs.com/

Along with the full source code:
http://github.com/jeresig/sizzle/tree/master

New API Browser

Along with the release of jQuery 1.3, I’m pleased to present the new API browser, developed by Remy Sharp, available at: http://api.jquery.com/.

jQuery API Browser
This is an alternative view to the existing jQuery API that should be easy to navigate and use.

The new API browser includes the following features:

  • All the latest jQuery and jQuery UI documentation.
  • The ability to mark pages as favorites for those pages you keep wanting to return to.
  • Syntax highlighting in the code examples
  • Live running of examples within the browser
  • Links to edit and experiment with the code examples

Most importantly though, the API browser is also available offline as an Adobe AIR application (thanks to Tane Piper’s AIR framework). The interface looks and works the same, and includes an auto-update mechanism, so you’ll always be up to date.

Download and install the AIR API browser

If you find problems please submit a bug to the bug tracker under the ‘site’ component.

Which leads us to the last, and certainly not the least important, point…

jQuery Foundation

With the jQuery Project growing at a tremendous rate, it was important for us, as a team, to take a step back and determine how the project’s ownership should be handled. Currently, John Resig, jQuery’s founder and lead developer, and Paul Bakaus, lead developer for jQuery UI, both maintain ownership of their respective projects. This posed several concerns from a practical and legal perspective as it enjoined two individuals as the owners of the projects instead of a formal organization. As more individuals and corporations started contributing to the projects, these concerns became even more evident causing confusion as to who were the correct copyright holders for specific units of work.

After meeting up to talk at the recent jQuery Conference, we decided to really make a concerted effort to fix this and determine how we could shift ownership of the jQuery projects to a foundation-type organization that would:

1. Understand the nature of open-source software development.
2. Allow us to continue to manage the project unhindered.
3. Ensure that the projects continue to live on regardless of who is involved in the effort.

After examining many options we came to a final conclusion – and we’re excited to announce that the Software Freedom Conservancy has extended the jQuery project an invitation to join the non-profit organization and continue developing software under its auspices. By joining The Software Freedom Conservancy, the jQuery projects and community immediately realize some important benefits:

1. It allows the current project members to continue to manage the projects and maintain ultimate responsibility for the direction of current and future efforts.
2. It allows the projects to be considered a true non-profit efforts allowing us to be able to accept donations and contributions without incurring tremendous personal financial liability.
3. The copyright of the code will be assigned to the conservancy thus ensuring that no single person will own contributions or assets of the project.
4. It may allow corporations to write off time when an employee contributes to a project.
5. Most importantly, it ensures that the jQuery projects will always be open and free software.

This is a big step in formalizing the jQuery projects and an important accomplishment in ensuring that the investment being made by the jQuery community is protected. We’ll be making the transition into the conservancy over the coming weeks. There will be very little, to no, change in how the project will run. The jQuery Team will still run and manage the project and we’re still going to work hard to build the best JavaScript library possible. If anything this will help to free up some of our time so that we can spend more time coding – and who doesn’t like the sound of that?

Happy 3rd birthday, jQuery!

Help Test jQuery 1.3 Beta 2

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We’re getting ever-closer to the final release of jQuery 1.3! In a follow-up to the recent 1.3 Beta 1 we have another test version for everyone to try. As with before, it’s not ready for production use yet but we definitely need help in hunting down any bugs that we may have missed.

Please don’t test 1.3 Beta 1 anymore – all testing should move on to beta 2. The final release of jQuery 1.3 will be on the 14th of January with a final release candidate available a few days before.

Download

A copy of jQuery 1.3b2 can be found here:

Please don’t use minified or packed versions of jQuery when testing – it makes locating bugs difficult.

Changes

So far two changes in 1.3 have been the most likely to cause problems:

  1. Old, XPath, style attribute selectors: [@attr=value]. These have been deprecated for quite some time – and we’re finally removing them. To fix it just remove the @!
  2. Bubbling triggered events. Triggered events now bubble up the DOM – some plugins haven’t expected this and have had to adapt. Its pretty easy to fix your code to “protect” against bubbling – add the following statement to your bound handler: if ( this === event.target ) { ... }

Tests

The test suite is holding up quite well. We currently have 1370 tests covering all aspects of the library and passing in all the major browsers:

jQuery 1.3b2

How to provide feedback:

  • Submit a bug to the jQuery bug tracker (you will need to create an account, first).
  • Be sure to include a simple test case for any problem that you’re experiencing (either attach the test case or provide a link).
  • Mention that you’re testing “jQuery 1.3 Beta 2″ (otherwise your ticket will get confused with another release).
  • Email a link to your test case and bug report to the jQuery Dev list so that the dev team will be notified about your issue.

Thanks to everyone, in advance, for all your help in testing this release. We’re really excited about this release and can’t wait to get it into your hands.