jQuery 1.8 Beta 2 Released

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It’s been a crazy few weeks around jQuery Central, what with the release of Beta 1 and the jQuery Conference in San Francisco following that. Fear not! Between all the travel, conferences, meetings, and blog posts about the future of jQuery, we’ve actually managed to write some more code. As proof, here is jQuery 1.8 Beta 2:

http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.8b2.js

This is the critical section in the program where we call on you, the jQuery community, to help us bring this one home. Use Beta 2 with old browsers, new browsers, red browsers and blue browsers. (That’s IE6, Chrome Canary, Opera, and Internet Explorer, respectively.) Test this file with all your code, please test it well in every mode. Did something break in Beta 2? Please tell us now before we’re through!

With assistance from those of you who tested Beta 1, we found a few bugs and squashed them. We can’t emphasize enough how important it is for us to get feedback from you as you test with these beta versions. We don’t like releasing final versions that cause problems when you drop them into your web pages, and the way to prevent that is to test with the beta and let us know about problems in advance.

NOTE: This release required coordination with jQuery UI to fix a few problems. For that reason, pages using jQuery UI will need to include the latest UI master version to test against jQuery 1.8b2. You can get it here: http://code.jquery.com/ui/jquery-ui-git.js. There will be a maintenance release of jQuery UI 1.8 that includes jQuery core 1.8 support, but users are encouraged to update to jQuery UI 1.9 when it is released.

If you find a problem, please try to reduce it to a simple test case. jsFiddle is our preferred way to get test cases, since it allows us to tweak the test case, diagnose the problem, and explore solutions. (Select jQuery (edge) for the framework, which is the latest code.) With test case in hand, head over to the bug tracker and let us know what happened. Thanks!

In addition to bug fixes reported in Beta 1, this new beta also has a significant rewrite of the Sizzle engine for even better performance. It fixes a big pile of bugs related to IE 6, 7, and 8 and makes those browsers more consistent to use. Perfection with oldIE will always be an elusive thing, but we’re still trying to make your development life as easy as possible no matter the browser.

If you build your own custom versions as described in the README file on Github, you now have the option of leaving out some of the deprecated functionality that will be removed in future versions. We’ll be adding to this file as we isolate additional deprecated functionality.

Below is a complete list of the changes since jQuery 1.7.2.

jQuery 1.8b2 Change Log

The current change log of the 1.8b2 release.

Ajax

  • #4624: Charset in default ajaxSettings.contentType
  • #10978: jQuery.param() should allow non-native constructed objects as property values
  • #11264: evalScript() uses defaults set by ajaxSetup()
  • #11426: jQuery.ajax() always fails when requesting JPG images in IE

Attributes

  • #5571: Allow chaining when passing undefined to any setter in jQuery
  • #10828: attr("coords") returns undefined in IE7
  • #10870: Incorrect behaviour of $.removeAttr("selected")
  • #11316: Consider looking through valHooks by element type first, then by nodeName instead of the other way around

Build

  • #10692: Configure the jshint options to more accurately match the style guide
  • #10693: generalize the "test something in an iframe" code in unit tests
  • #10901: have unit tests fail if the tester is running from file:// or doesn't have PHP
  • #10902: ability to test a built version of jQuery in unit tests
  • #10931: Unit tests shouldn't require internet access

Core

  • #10466: jQuery.param() mistakes wrapped primitives for deep objects

Css

  • #10639: outerWidth(true) and css('margin') returning % instead of px in Webkit
  • #10754: have jQuery.swap return the return of the callback instead of just executing it
  • #10782: Incorrect calculating width
  • #10796: Bug in IE7 with $('#el').css.('background-position')
  • #10858: css.js regular expressions are incomplete
  • #11119: The curCSS function only need 2 arguments

Data

  • #11309: hexadecimal-formatted data-* attributes parsed incorrectly

Deferred

  • #11306: calling .disable() or .lock() on a $.Callbacks object breaks its fired() status

Effects

  • #8498: Animate Hooks
  • #10006: method show is not working as expected in all browsers when called for document fragment
  • #10848: Animation toggling loses state tracking in certain atomic edge cases
  • #11415: Silently ignore negative CSS values where they are illegal
  • #11469: Negative margin in animations (.animate)

Event

  • #8165: .live('click', handler) fires on disabled buttons with child elements in Chrome
  • #10819: Eliminate "this.on.call(this, "
  • #10878: $("select").live("change", function(){ …broken in IE8 in jQuery 1.7
  • #10961: Error in XRegExp using jQuery 1.7.1 in IE6-9
  • #10970: The .on() selector parameter doesn't work with :not(:first) selector
  • #10984: Cannot off() custom events ($.event.special)
  • #11021: Hover hack mangles a namespace named "hover"
  • #11076: .clone(true) loses delegation filters
  • #11130: jQuery.fn.on: binding map with null selector ignores data
  • #11145: $(document).on() not working with name="disabled"

Manipulation

  • #9427: Passing undefined to .text() does not trigger setter
  • #10753: inline the evalScript function in manipulation.js as it's only used once
  • #10864: text() method on a document fragment always returns the empty string
  • #11055: Update HTML5 Shim elements list to support latest html5shiv
  • #11217: Append problem with webkit
  • #11291: Cloning XMLDoc's with HTML5 nodeName's breaks on IE
  • #11323: script tags with type="text/ecmascript" leak into the DOM
  • #11356: safeFragment memory leak

Misc

  • #10952: .fired() doesn't work on Callbacks object when it is flagged with "once"
  • #11257: Wrong path to source files in test suite if PHP missing

Queue

  • #10967: .promise() does not attach methods onto target

Support

  • #7986: Bug in $.support.boxModel if page has DIV-element CSS
  • #11048: Support Tests affect layout for positioned elements in IE6-9
  • #11337: Bug in $.support.reliableMarginRight

Traversing

  • #11370: $('<div>').siblings() throws exception

Just Added: Training at SF jQuery Conference!

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In response to the flood of requests and emails, and our original promise to work on this, we’ve got an announcement: we’ve added a single day Beginner/Intermediate training right before the San Francisco jQuery Conference :)

Tickets are on sale now (left side, below the fold). The training will be provided by our friends at Bocoup, and hosted by the ever-generous folks at Microsoft. Here’s a snippet of what Trainers Ben Alman and Rebecca Murphey will be covering:

At Bocoup’s intermediate one-day jQuery training, you’ll work with jQuery veterans to build a foundation that will make you a stronger developer and get you prepared for all the great talks that you’ll see over the next two days. You’ll even learn the basics of creating your own jQuery plugin. Topics that will be covered include:

  • The jQuery() function
  • Selecting & Traversing
  • Manipulating the DOM
  • Making stuff happen with Events
  • AJAX
  • Enhancing with Effects
  • Extending jQuery with Plugins
  • jQuery UI
  • jQuery Mobile

To note: the training and conference are both in San Francisco, but take place in different locations. The training is in the heart of San Fran on Market Street, and the conference is about five to ten minutes from there, on the UCSF Mission Bay campus. Please also note that the conference and training require separate admission tickets, so make sure you’ve purchased both if you’d like to attend both.

We’re still working on the possibility of adding an Advanced training, but thus far have had mostly requests for beginner materials. So here that is :)

Hope you’ve all bought your tickets to the conference; can’t wait to see you there!

Getting Touchy About Patents

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Touch events have become a hot topic for web developers as more and more companies move into the mobile space. Most of us know that touch events support single and multi-touch tracking. Some of us know the trickiness of working with touch and mouse at the same time. Fewer know that there are multiple touch event models, and even fewer have tried to support multiple models at the same time. I’d like to talk about where we are today, how we got here, and the potential problems we may face in the future.

A Brief History

Back in 2007, Apple introduced the iPhone, and with it came touch events. Neil Roberts sums up the Apple implementation well in a SitePen article: “Though at first the APIs seem a little sketchy, once you’ve learned them you should be able to do amazing things in your application.” Sure enough, we’ve seen plenty of amazing things, without too much complaint of the “sketchy” API. This model was later implemented by Android, Nokia, RIM, Opera, and others. Apple’s implementation is still only available in their private fork of WebKit; it wasn’t until the end of 2009 that touch events first appeared in the main WebKit repo, coming from the Android implementation.

Also in 2009, the W3C started discussing a unified pointer model for DOM Level 3 Events. The idea was that touch (including multi-touch), pen/stylus, and mouse events would be coalesced into a single model, making it easy to support all pointer types at once. However, this was abandoned because the goal at the time was to keep the spec as small as possible in order to become a recommendation faster.

Another two years later (March 2011), Mozilla released Firefox 4, featuring their own flavor of touch events. The Mozilla model is much closer to the mouse event model and the abandoned W3C model in that the event objects are flat; properties such as event.pageX exist and there is no touch list. If you want to track multiple touches, you can do so via the event’s streamId. Mozilla later deprecated this implementation in favor of an emerging W3C spec based on Apple’s model.

In January 2011, the W3C started drafting a Touch Events spec based on the WebKit implementation. A few months later, it became a Working Draft, and in December it became a Candidate Recommendation. The next month, a Patent Advisory Group (PAG) was formed in order to investigate patents disclosed by Apple. Apple’s absence from the Touch Events Working Group (WG) and their patent disclosure has caused the W3C to stop work on the spec and they do not plan to continue until the PAG has concluded and/or makes a recommendation to the WG. As of this writing, the PAG has not made a decision about the impact of the patents, but the group’s goal is to reach a speedy conclusion.

Meanwhile, Microsoft took a different approach to touch and has implemented their own pointer events in IE10 with the MSPointerEvent object. The MSPointerEvent object is similar to the original Mozilla implementation, in that the event objects are flat and contain a pointerId property. However, there are some important differences between MSPointer and all of the other models, which are touch-specific.

Note: The above is just a brief history of touch events on the Web; if you’re interested in the history of touch interfaces, you might want to check out Bill Buxton’s Multi-Touch Systems that I Have Known and Loved.

Pointer Events vs. Touch Events

As mentioned above, generic pointer events such as the original W3C idea or MSPointer, have the benefit of supporting multiple pointer devices. In fact, with a Samsung tablet running Windows 8, mouse, pen, and fingers are all normalized to MSPointer; you can even use the pointerType property to determine which type of pointer is being used. In addition to supporting all current pointer devices, MSPointer is designed in such a way that future devices can easily be added, and existing code will automatically support the new device. Even better, MSPointer event objects have the same structure as other events, reducing the learning curve compared to the conglomerate of TouchEvent, TouchList, and Touch.

Another big difference between MSPointer and Touch is that MSPointer has support for hovering (over and out events). While most touch devices have a hardware limitation that doesn’t allow for hovering, Sony recently announced the Xperia sola with “magical floating touch technology.” This brings up an important issue: Touch Events were designed based on a specific device for a specific type of input. Pointer Events represent a completely different approach to input on the Web. While we’ve already covered how this impacts developers, it’s interesting to consider the impact on hardware manufacturers. In order for Apple to succeed with touch interfaces, they had to create a new event model. Innovation for new form factors and new input methods will either be stifled by the existing standards or will require a new set of APIs, following in Apple’s footsteps with the iPhone and Touch Events. Pointer Events provides a clean solution not only for developers, but for hardware manufacturers as well. It’s conceivable that in a few years developers could use Pointer Events as the only event model for pointers, leaving Mouse Events as a thing of the past.

A Splintered Future

Although the W3C is still planning to move forward with the Touch Events spec (pending a recommendation from the PAG), the future is unclear. Even if the PAG determines that Apple’s patents don’t apply and the spec becomes a W3C Recommendation, it’s not clear that Microsoft would implement such a model given the need for a multi-input event system in Windows. If the W3C were to change directions and start a Pointer Events spec, it’s not clear that Apple, or more broadly WebKit, would implement the new event model. It’s entirely possible that even with a W3C Recommendation, we’ll be stuck for years without a consistent event model across browsers and devices.

Regardless of which model the W3C chooses to pursue, jQuery is dedicated to filling in the gaps, just like we do for other events such as submit and change. We think the pointer event model is easier to use and more future-proof, and we hope that it can be standardized, even if Touch Events are standardized as well. However, we are only interested in normalizing to a W3C Recommendation, and will not provide custom pointer events if there is no official W3C specification. We’re working with the W3C and Microsoft to try to find the best way forward for our users and the Open Web.

Call to Action: Microsoft to Submit Pointer Event Proposal

We would like to publicly call upon Microsoft to submit a proposal to the W3C for Pointer Events. The Touch Events Working Group, and by extension various browser vendors, have stated interest in pointer events. The most effective way to proceed would be for Microsoft to officially submit a proposal to the W3C.

Call to Action: Community to Experiment with Both Event Models

We would also encourage the community to experiment with Touch and MSPointer. Play with the APIs, build apps, and provide feedback. If you’re interested in this, but don’t have the necessary hardware, consider pairing up with one or more local developers who do. While there are a lot of developers building on top of Touch, there are very few people building on top of MSPointer, and even fewer publicly comparing them. We encourage you to send your feedback directly to the W3C public-webevents mailing list, but feel free to leave feedback here and we will pass it along.

Call to Action: Submit Prior Art

If you know of any prior art for multi-touch/touch lists, even outside of the Web, please get in touch with the W3C. This includes programming models and APIs, especially those using events. This will help the Patent Advisory Group come to a conclusion sooner. Again, if you’d rather leave comments here, we will pass them along.

jQuery 1.7.2 Released

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jQuery 1.7.2 is looking good! The release candidate went smoothly so we’ve made only one small change and are releasing it to your eager hands today. You can get the oven-fresh code from the jQuery CDN now, with Google and Microsoft CDNs soon to follow:

Note: If you’re using jQuery Mobile, please use jQuery 1.7.2 only with jQuery Mobile 1.1. For previous versions of jQuery Mobile, stay with jQuery core 1.7.1 or earlier.

You can use the bug tracker to report bugs; be sure to create a test case on jsFiddle so we can figure it out easily. If you’re not sure it’s a bug, ask on our forum or on StackOverflow. Please don’t use the blog comments below to report bugs.

As always, this release wouldn’t have been possible without the hard work of many people. First, the jQuery Core Team: gnarf, jaubourg, mikesherov, rwldrn, and timmywil. The support of the jQuery UI, Mobile, and Infrastructure teams was greatly appreciated as well, especially danheberden’s valiant struggle against Trac.

Community members like adebree, caii, cmc3cn, KYSergey, mathiasbynens, miskith, MrMamen, Orkel, pasky, SineSwiper, tavelli, and vlazar pitched in by reporting, verifying, and fixing bugs. Special jQuery Gold Leaf Cluster thanks to gibson042 and sindresorhus for their work in making 1.7.2 a great release. Don’t let these people have all the fun! If you’d like to contribute to the web’s most popular Javascript library, hop onto #jquery-dev on IRC or the Developing jQuery Core section on our forum and say hello!

Many thanks to Louis-Rémi Babé, who submitted a patch to fix a regression with negative margin animations a mere 30 minutes before the release!

jQuery 1.7.2 Change Log

Here’s the change log of the 1.7.2 release.

Ajax

  • #4624: Charset in default ajaxSettings.contentType
  • #10978: jQuery.param() should allow non-native constructed objects as property values
  • #11264: evalScript() uses defaults set by ajaxSetup()
  • #11426: jQuery.ajax() always fails when requesting JPG images in IE

Attributes

  • #5571: Allow chaining when passing undefined to any setter in jQuery
  • #10828: attr(“coords”) returns undefined in IE7
  • #10870: Incorrect behaviour of $.removeAttr(“selected”)
  • #11316: Consider looking through valHooks by element type first, then by nodeName instead of the other way around

Build

  • #10692: Configure the jshint options to more accurately match the style guide
  • #10693: generalize the “test something in an iframe” code in unit tests
  • #10901: have unit tests fail if the tester is running from file:// or doesn’t have PHP
  • #10902: ability to test a built version of jQuery in unit tests
  • #10931: Unit tests shouldn’t require internet access

Core

  • #10466: jQuery.param() mistakes wrapped primitives for deep objects

Css

  • #10639: outerWidth(true) and css(‘margin’) returning % instead of px in Webkit
  • #10754: have jQuery.swap return the return of the callback instead of just executing it
  • #10782: Incorrect calculating width
  • #10796: Bug in IE7 with $(‘#el’).css.(‘background-position’)
  • #10858: css.js regular expressions are incomplete
  • #11119: The curCSS function only need 2 arguments

Data

  • #11309: hexadecimal-formatted data-* attributes parsed incorrectly

Deferred

  • #11306: calling .disable() or .lock() on a $.Callbacks object breaks its fired() status

Dimensions

  • #3838: $(document).height() incorrect in IE6

Effects

  • #8498: Animate Hooks
  • #10006: method show is not working as expected in all browsers when called for document fragment
  • #10848: Animation toggling loses state tracking in certain atomic edge cases
  • #11415: Silently ignore negative CSS values where they are illegal
  • #11469: Negative margin in animations (.animate)

Event

  • #8165: .live(‘click’, handler) fires on disabled buttons with child elements in Chrome
  • #10819: Eliminate “this.on.call(this, “
  • #10878: $(“select”).live(“change”, function(){ …broken in IE8 in jQuery 1.7
  • #10961: Error in XRegExp using jQuery 1.7.1 in IE6-9
  • #10970: The .on() selector parameter doesn’t work with :not(:first) selector
  • #10984: Cannot off() custom events ($.event.special)
  • #11021: Hover hack mangles a namespace named “hover”
  • #11076: .clone(true) loses delegation filters
  • #11130: jQuery.fn.on: binding map with null selector ignores data
  • #11145: $(document).on() not working with name=”disabled”

Manipulation

  • #9427: Passing undefined to .text() does not trigger setter
  • #10753: inline the evalScript function in manipulation.js as it’s only used once
  • #10864: text() method on a document fragment always returns the empty string
  • #11055: Update HTML5 Shim elements list to support latest html5shiv
  • #11217: Append problem with webkit
  • #11291: Cloning XMLDoc’s with HTML5 nodeName’s breaks on IE
  • #11323: script tags with type=”text/ecmascript” leak into the DOM
  • #11356: safeFragment memory leak

Misc

  • #10952: .fired() doesn’t work on Callbacks object when it is flagged with “once”
  • #11257: Wrong path to source files in test suite if PHP missing

Queue

  • #10967: .promise() does not attach methods onto target

Support

  • #7986: Bug in $.support.boxModel if page has DIV-element CSS
  • #11048: Support Tests affect layout for positioned elements in IE6-9
  • #11337: Bug in $.support.reliableMarginRight

Traversing

  • #11370: $(‘<div>’).siblings() throws exception

jQuery 1.7.2 RC1 Released

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jQuery 1.7.2 will be arriving soon! To make sure that we’ve fixed the bugs voted “Most Likely to Annoy” without introducing any new bugs, we need your help in testing this release candidate. You can get the code from the jQuery CDN:

It will only take a few minutes to drop in this latest file and test it with your code. If you’ve got a lot of pages, the list of fixed bugs below may be a helpful guide for determining what to test. And of course, if you reported a bug or were affected by one listed below, please re-test to be sure we fixed it for good. We’ve tested it internally against the current builds of jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile. There is one compatibility issue with jQuery Mobile 1.1 RC1 that has already been fixed and will be addressed by their next release.

Looking for an even easier way to test your web site with the latest jQuery? On Windows you can use the excellent Fiddler tool and create an AutoResponder rule to point your HTTP script requests for jQuery to the file location above. Then you are testing your live web site with the latest jQuery on your PC, without having to edit any files at all! If you know of similar tools for other platforms, leave a message in the comments below.

If you are particularly interested in IE6 support, please help us out. We are having sporadic trouble running the unit tests in IE6. It hasn’t been possible for us to determine the cause of these problems, but the problem doesn’t happen consistently and the sheer size of our test suite may just be overwhelming a browser that is more than a decade old. If you observe any reproducible failures in real code, please let us know and try to provide the smallest possible test case.

You can use the bug tracker to report bugs; be sure to create a test case on jsFiddle so we can figure it out easily. If you’re not sure it’s a bug, ask on our forum or on StackOverflow. Please don’t use the blog comments below to report bugs.

jQuery 1.7.2rc1 Change Log

Here’s the current change log of the 1.7.2rc1 release.

Ajax

  • #4624: Charset in default ajaxSettings.contentType
  • #10978: jQuery.param() should allow non-native constructed objects as property values
  • #11264: evalScript() uses defaults set by ajaxSetup()
  • #11426: jQuery.ajax() always fails when requesting JPG images in IE

Attributes

  • #5571: Allow chaining when passing undefined to any setter in jQuery
  • #10828: attr(“coords”) returns undefined in IE7
  • #10870: Incorrect behaviour of $.removeAttr(“selected”)
  • #11316: Consider looking through valHooks by element type first, then by nodeName instead of the other way around

Build

  • #10692: Configure the jshint options to more accurately match the style guide
  • #10693: generalize the “test something in an iframe” code in unit tests
  • #10901: have unit tests fail if the tester is running from file:// or doesn’t have PHP
  • #10902: ability to test a built version of jQuery in unit tests
  • #10931: Unit tests shouldn’t require internet access

Core

  • #10466: jQuery.param() mistakes wrapped primitives for deep objects

Css

  • #10639: outerWidth(true) and css(‘margin’) returning % instead of px in Webkit
  • #10754: have jQuery.swap return the return of the callback instead of just executing it
  • #10782: Incorrect calculating width
  • #10796: Bug in IE7 with $(‘#el’).css.(‘background-position’)
  • #10858: css.js regular expressions are incomplete
  • #11119: The curCSS function only need 2 arguments

Data

  • #11309: hexadecimal-formatted data-* attributes parsed incorrectly

Deferred

  • #11306: calling .disable() or .lock() on a $.Callbacks object breaks its fired() status

Dimensions

  • #3838: $(document).height() incorrect in IE6

Effects

  • #8498: Animate Hooks
  • #10006: method show is not working as expected in all browsers when called for document fragment
  • #10848: Animation toggling loses state tracking in certain atomic edge cases
  • #11415: Silently ignore negative CSS values where they are illegal

Event

  • #8165: .live(‘click’, handler) fires on disabled buttons with child elements in Chrome
  • #10819: Eliminate “this.on.call(this, “
  • #10878: $(“select”).live(“change”, function(){ …broken in IE8 in jQuery 1.7
  • #10961: Error in XRegExp using jQuery 1.7.1 in IE6-9
  • #10970: The .on() selector parameter doesn’t work with :not(:first) selector
  • #10984: Cannot off() custom events ($.event.special)
  • #11021: Hover hack mangles a namespace named “hover”
  • #11076: .clone(true) loses delegation filters
  • #11130: jQuery.fn.on: binding map with null selector ignores data
  • #11145: $(document).on() not working with name=”disabled”

Manipulation

  • #9427: Passing undefined to .text() does not trigger setter
  • #10753: inline the evalScript function in manipulation.js as it’s only used once
  • #10864: text() method on a document fragment always returns the empty string
  • #11055: Update HTML5 Shim elements list to support latest html5shiv
  • #11217: Append problem with webkit
  • #11291: Cloning XMLDoc’s with HTML5 nodeName’s breaks on IE
  • #11323: script tags with type=”text/ecmascript” leak into the DOM
  • #11356: safeFragment memory leak

Misc

  • #10952: .fired() doesn’t work on Callbacks object when it is flagged with “once”
  • #11257: Wrong path to source files in test suite if PHP missing

Queue

  • #10967: .promise() does not attach methods onto target

Support

  • #7986: Bug in $.support.boxModel if page has DIV-element CSS
  • #11048: Support Tests affect layout for positioned elements in IE6-9
  • #11337: Bug in $.support.reliableMarginRight

Traversing

  • #11370: $(‘<div>’).siblings() throws exception

Announcing the jQuery Foundation

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(BOSTON) — The jQuery Board, in conjunction with Software Freedom Conservancy, is proud to announce the formation of the jQuery Foundation, Inc., an independent organization that will manage jQuery, the Internet’s number one JavaScript library, and its constituent projects.

The jQuery Board previously administered jQuery under the aegis of the Conservancy, a public charity that acts as a non-profit home for free software projects.

The new jQuery Foundation is a non-profit trade association dedicated to supporting development of the jQuery Core, UI, and Mobile projects; providing jQuery documentation and support; and fostering the jQuery community.

Dave Methvin, who recently took over as the head of the jQuery Core development team, will also serve as the Foundation’s President. “jQuery is the most popular JavaScript library, and creating an autonomous organization is the next step in ensuring its future development and benefiting everyone who uses jQuery,” said Methvin. “We’ll be announcing several initiatives shortly, including the next jQuery Conference and other efforts driven by needs within the community and the project.”

“I’m extremely excited to see the jQuery Foundation springing to life. I’m glad that Dave Methvin is leading the foundation and the direction of the core library. He’s a good friend and exceedingly capable of moving jQuery forward,” said John Resig, who created the library in 2005. “Meanwhile, I’ve been spending more time focusing on improving the state of JavaScript and programming education at Khan Academy. I’m psyched to be a part of the jQuery core team and Foundation and can’t wait to see how jQuery grows in the upcoming years.”

“We are proud that the jQuery Board has built jQuery into a vibrant and successful Open Source community under Conservancy’s mentorship,” said Bradley Kuhn, Executive Director of the Software Freedom Conservancy. “Our mission includes helping member projects determine whether to form their own organization, and we’re pleased jQuery is the first Conservancy project to take that step.”

The jQuery Foundation would like to thank Joel G. Kinney of Fort Point Legal, whose generous pro-bono counsel has been invaluable in transitioning to an independent organization. The Foundation is also proud to accept an honorary first donation from the Linux Fund, which has chosen to continue its tradition of supporting the open source community with a contribution to the Foundation’s inaugural operating expense budget.

About jQuery
Created in 2005 by John Resig as a JavaScript library to provide an intuitive approach for working with the DOM and Ajax, jQuery has steadily gained popularity among the development community and is the most widely-adopted JavaScript library in use today.

About the jQuery Foundation
The jQuery Foundation is a non-profit trade association and the home of jQuery, the Internet’s number one JavaScript library.  Founded by a group of leading JavaScript developers and architects, the jQuery Foundation is dedicated to three goals:  supporting development of the jQuery Core, UI, and Mobile projects; providing jQuery documentation and support; and fostering the jQuery community.

jQuery Foundation, Inc. is a Delaware non-profit currently seeking IRS 501(c)(6) status.  Donations to the jQuery Foundation will be used to further the goals of the Foundation.  For more information, visit http://jquery.org.

About Software Freedom Conservancy
Software Freedom Conservancy is a non-profit organization that helps promote, improve, develop and defend Free, Libre and Open Source software projects.  Conservancy is a home to twenty-eight software projects, each supported by a dedicated community of volunteers, developers, and users.  Conservancy’s projects include some of the most widely used software systems in the world across many application areas, including educational software deployed in schools around the globe, embedded software systems deployed in most consumer electronic devices, distributed version control developer tools, integrated library services systems, and widely used graphics and art programs.  A full list of Conservancy’s projects can be found at http://sfconservancy.org/members/current/.  Conservancy provides to these projects the necessary infrastructure and not-for-profit support services to enable the project’s communities to focus on what they do best: creating innovative software and advancing computing for the public’s benefit.

jQuery 1.7.2 Beta 1 Released

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Hey there Internets, it’s the jQuery Core team! We haven’t talked in a while, but over the holidays we were busy fixing the bugs you reported. The result of that hard work is jQuery 1.7.2 Beta 1. We decided to get a beta out by Groundhog Day so you wouldn’t be in the shadow of six more weeks of unfixed bugs.

You can get the code from the jQuery CDN:

Oh, we know what you’re thinking: “Cool, a new version of jQuery; I’ll wait until the final release has been out a few weeks and then I’ll give it a try.” Right, and then you’ll find some bug that keeps you from upgrading. Nothing makes us sadder than finishing up a release and only then seeing a report of a serious bug that could have been fixed earlier.

So please, come out of your burrow and try this beta with your code. Did we miss an old bug? Did we create a new bug that makes you feel like Bill Murray waking up to “I Got You Babe?” We want to know. You can use the bug tracker to report bugs; be sure to create a test case on jsFiddle so we can figure it out easily. If you’re not sure it’s a bug, ask on our forum or on StackOverflow.

jQuery 1.7.2b1 Change Log

The current change log of the 1.7.2b1 release.

Ajax

  • #10978: jQuery.param() should allow non-native constructed objects as property values

Attributes

  • #5571: Allow chaining when passing undefined to any setter in jQuery

Build

  • #10692: Configure the jshint options to more accurately match the style guide
  • #10902: ability to test a built version of jQuery in unit tests
  • #10931: Unit tests shouldn’t require internet access

Core

  • #10466: jQuery.param() mistakes wrapped primitives for deep objects

Css

  • #10639: outerWidth(true) and css(‘margin’) returning % instead of px in Webkit
  • #10754: have jQuery.swap return the return of the callback instead of just executing it
  • #10782: Incorrect calculating width
  • #10796: Bug in IE7 with $(‘#el’).css.(‘background-position’)
  • #10858: css.js regular expressions are incomplete
  • #11119: The curCSS function only need 2 arguments

Effects

  • #8498: Animate Hooks
  • #10006: method show is not working as expected in all browsers when called for document fragment
  • #10848: Animation toggling loses state tracking in certain atomic edge cases

Event

  • #8165: .live(‘click’, handler) fires on disabled buttons with child elements in Chrome
  • #10819: Eliminate “this.on.call(this, “
  • #10878: $(“select”).live(“change”, function(){ …broken in IE8 in jQuery 1.7
  • #10961: Error in XRegExp using jQuery 1.7.1 in IE6-9
  • #10970: The .on() selector parameter doesn’t work with :not(:first) selector
  • #10984: Cannot off() custom events ($.event.special)
  • #11021: Hover hack mangles a namespace named “hover”
  • #11076: .clone(true) loses delegation filters
  • #11130: jQuery.fn.on: binding map with null selector ignores data
  • #11145: $(document).on() not working with name=”disabled”

Manipulation

  • #9427: Passing undefined to .text() does not trigger setter
  • #10753: inline the evalScript function in manipulation.js as it’s only used once
  • #10864: text() method on a document fragment always returns the empty string
  • #11055: Update HTML5 Shim elements list to support latest html5shiv

Misc

  • #10952: .fired() doesn’t work on Callbacks object when it is flagged with “once”
  • #11257: Wrong path to source files in test suite if PHP missing

Support

  • #11048: Support Tests affect layout for positioned elements in IE6-9

Plugins Site Update: The Old Is New Again

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We’ve gotten a lot of feedback since last week’s announcement about the plugins site’s unfortunate tumble into oblivion, and I’d like to address a few of the most important concerns that have surfaced since.

“Could you make the old backup available for posterity?”

Yes. We can — and have. Over the weekend, we restored the most recent backup we had, and the original site is now living at archive.plugins.jquery.com; you should be able to browse through everything that’s there to your heart’s content. We also applied the most recent user information we had, so if you had an account on the old site at any point in the last year, it should still work. However, the site is closed to new user registrations. If you really need a new account, please get in touch with me personally and I can get that straightened out for you. We’ve also set up a redirect, so that if you should encounter any links to plugins.jquery.com in your browsing, you’ll (hopefully) end up at the corresponding page in the archive.

Just get a backup from the Wayback Machine!

While the Internet Archive has cached versions of content that was updated more recently than last October, we just don’t have the people-power to re-create the lost posts manually in the new archive site. If you have an account, you can feel free to add “new” or old plugins, or update existing ones, should you desire to. However, this archive will not be indexed by search engines.

If you hate CMS-es so much, what’s with WordPress?

We’re in the middle of a network-wide redesign, and WordPress offers us a valuable set of tools when it comes to theming, searching, and serving a group of sites. Our new motto, however, is pull requests, not passwords; we’re implementing theming, documentation, plugins, and more in such a way that contribution will not actually require an account on our CMS at all. As I outlined in the initial post, the plugin submission process will only involve adding a post-receive hook to your repository. In the event of a similar catastrophe, we’re made sure we’ll be able to replay the entire plugin contribution history and get the site back up to speed right away. Our goal is to leverage the WordPress features we find useful without it serving as a barrier to entry or as the canonical warehouse of content. If you are of the mind that WordPress is always a bad idea, no matter what, no matter how, you’re certainly entitled to that opinion, but at this point, it’s not particularly beneficial to the conversation.

Git(Hub) is hard

The new plugins site will serve as an index of plugins, with a simple “download” button right on each plugin’s page. You will not have to just browse around GitHub looking for jQuery plugins. If you don’t know git and only ever want to download jQuery plugins, you don’t have to learn it. However, if you want to submit plugins, you’ll have to be using some sort of source control that you can at least mirror in git. This is by design: it can be really easy to build a jQuery plugin, but that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily fit for public consumption. Requiring the use of source control and package.json are passive mechanisms that will help ensure that plugins which proliferate are authored by developers who have met a reasonable baseline (and aren’t selling batteries). We’re only targeting GitHub support for launch, but we’d like to add support for other services as well. We are actively avoiding the use of GitHub-specific features that would force us to limit the site to GithHub users permanently.

It’s A Conspiracy!

Some have called into question the veracity of my account, and that’s understandable, given the timing and circumstances. But believe me, the last thing I wanted to do after spending a day manually pruning spam from the directory was turn around and cause a gigantic headache for thousands of people, including myself and my colleagues. I hope the re-launching of the last backup at least partially allays these concerns. Additionally, we’re starting off with GitHub simply because it has a very broad user base already, and it has been incredibly positive for us since we shifted to it for development of jQuery Core, UI, and Mobile.

Thanks again for bearing with us during this transition.

What Is Happening To The jQuery Plugins Site?

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For about a week, instead of hosting several hundred jQuery plugins and several thousand advertisements for laptop batteries, our plugins repository has been serving up a pretty pathetic message about spam and an allusion to some “new submission process.” This happened very suddenly, and we’re sorry to everyone who’s been inconvenienced. Please allow me a few minutes to explain what happened, where we’re headed, and how it impacts you. If you’re in a rush, here’s the short version.

The Backstory

A White Elephant Though the plugins site you’ve known and loved was a valuable tool when it was first set up, it gradually became something of a white elephant for the project. While powerful distribution tools like GitHub and npm have come to the fore, we’ve been stuck in an aging, CMS-oriented paradigm that frustrated developers and consumers of plugins alike. Many people moved onto alternative sources for finding and vetting plugins. Furthermore, the sites’s original implementors and maintainers had since moved on from active involvement within the jQuery project. While the team faced a steady stream of complaints about usability and a general lack of features, the site itself faced a veritable barrage of (several flavors of) spam. There was your standard, keyword-rich SEO garbage, but there was also something slightly more insidious: the batch posting of under-documented, demo-free plugins with links to paid download sites by third parties trawling for affiliate cash. While this wasn’t explcitly disallowed, it led to a terrible, confusing experience for users and gave the site the distinct sense that all was not on the up and up.

The Best Laid Plans…

Sensitive to all these problems, the team began drawing up requirements for a complete overhaul. We knew we wanted to get out of the business of accepting uploads, serving downloads, and generally legislating the plugin “release” process on our own servers. With our official projects already on GitHub, we knew we wanted to leverage the many wheels they’d already invented for distribution, versioning, and facilitating open, collaborative development. Another requirement was to create a standard schema for authors to clearly delineate dependencies, like which version(s) of jQuery a plugin supports, as well as other plugins and CSS assets it requires to be functional. We also wanted to introduce some quality control, with both passive mechanisms like requiring GitHub and a manifest file for distribution, as well as active ones like user ratings. Finally, we wanted a clean slate; with stricter requirements for submission, there could be no mass import of all the old plugins. We made a lot of progress preparing specifications, but hampered by a lack of resources and a number of other projects, we never were able to get too deep into the implementation phase. After all, the old site “worked!”

…Often Go Awry

Throwing the baby out with the bathwater

As the glut of spam grew worse and multiple reports started showing up on the jQuery Core bug tracker, I wanted to at least take some steps to wipe a bit of the spam and egg off our face. With newly provisioned access to the administrative tools on the site, I teamed up with the Drupal Views Bulk Operations module and set out to identify and delete spammers and their posts. Within a day or two, nearly 90% of the alleged “content” was gone from the site. I continued to monitor the situation over the ensuing days, and deleted spam as it came in. Unfortunately, I likely cast too wide of a net, and threw out several perfectly good babies with the bathwater. Even more unfortunately, I didn’t back up the database before I began this process. At this point, you can probably see where this story is headed. Later in the week, while I was attempting to delete four spam items, I was left completely horrified when the results of the operation reported that the remaining 10% — every single plugin remaining in the database — had been purged. All that remained was a year-old backup. Of course, I realize that this is a dreadful outcome, and I take full responsibility for it. If it helps, I am very receptive to hate mail and tweets reprimanding me for being irresponsible, unprofessional, or just stupid.

At this juncture, we were left with two choices.

  • Keep on kicking the can down the road: Restore from the old backup, losing a lot of data anyway, and have authors go through the painstaking process of re-uploading their plugins, even though the site was slated to be deprecated entirely anyway.
  • Use this glaring mistake as the impetus to hunker down, cleave from the past, and finally implement the site we’ve talked about for so long.

We’ve chosen the latter.

Nuts And Bolts

Over the past few days, we’ve started converting our plans into action, building out an infrastructure that’s backed by GitHub. There are two requirements for listing a plugin on the new site:
Success Kid is helping out as well

  • A valid package.json file
    We’ve followed the lead of CommonJS and npm and created a schema for specifying dependencies, delivery, and other metadata of jQuery plugins. While the format is largely similar to those other projects, we’ve had to make some minor tweaks to account for some plugin-specific details.
  • At least one versioned release
    This means having tagged your release point(s) with a valid semantic version number (semver) string.

We’ve pared down the submission and maintenance process to a single, one-time step: adding a post-receive hook to your plugin’s GitHub repository. Assuming your plugin meets the guidelines, a page will be created on the plugins site to present your usage and download information. We’ll keep track of new releases as you push them.

In The Interim

We recognize that the old site was still serving as an regular resource for a lot of people, especially newer jQuery users, who simply valued the existence of a central browsing location, despite its flaws. Though many experienced users had moved on to other sites, or relied on relationships with trusted authors and word of mouth, these can take time to develop. Until we’re able to launch the new system, we’re happy to direct you to several other directories and people who can help pick up the slack:

If, in the process of searching these or any other directories, you are directed back to the current site at plugins.jquery.com, typically a quick search for the author’s name and the plugin name will yield an alternative site where it was hosted. In addition, DailyJS just did a useful roundup of alternatives that goes into more detail.

Next Steps For Plugin Authors

If you’re a plugin developer who wants to make sure your plugins will be ready to go on day one (or even beforehand), you’ll want to make sure your plugins are up on GitHub, and then you’ll want to get started on creating your package.json files and making sure your versions are appropriately tagged. If you aren’t already familiar with Git and GitHub, then this is probably a very good time for you to take the plunge and get started. If you prefer another SCM system, you can look into setting up a mirror to git from svn or hg, or other project hosting sites, like bitbucket or gitorious. If you don’t develop your plugins as open source, or you don’t use any source control at all, we will not be able to accomodate you at this time.

How Can I Help?

Though the site is still a work in progress, you can track progress and even set up your own local development right now at github.com/jquery/plugins.jquery.com/. We’re still working on getting a public staging environment together.

Though the site is essentially “powered by” GitHub, there are obviously a number of moving parts in play. The site will actually be served from inside of WordPress, which is populated with the contents of the indexed plugins using a node.js tool. There are still many kinks to be ironed out, so if that sounds like a stack you want to jump on, please join us over at the repo. We’ll be using GitHub Issues for all feature requests, bugs, and discussion.

While we’ve put a great deal of thought into putting together our package.json schema, it’s still a living document, and if you have questions or comments on why it is the way that it is, head on over to this issue.

Errata

In an ideal world, this certainly wouldn’t have happened exactly as it did. Sadly, it did. We hope you’ll accept our apologies for the many ways this transition might make your job harder, give you some extra work you weren’t expecting, or just plain leave a bad taste in your mouth. If you are able to forgive us, bear with us, and maybe even lend a hand, we’re confident we’ll be able to deliver the modern, useful plugins site the community deserves.

TL;DR

So that was a lot of words, here’s the takeaway.

  • We’d been planning on replacing the original, spam-ridden plugin site for quite some time
  • In the process of deleting on the spam, all the plugins were deleted and we didn’t have a recent backup
  • Instead of burning cycles keeping the old site on life support, we decided to make a clean break and kick development on the new site into high gear.
  • The new site is powered by GitHub and a package manifest for plugins
  • Plugins from the old site were never going to be automatically imported into the new one.
  • The repo is at github.com/jquery/plugins.jquery.com
  • We are very sorry, but also very excited!

jQuery Conference 2012: UK – Training Workshops Announced

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We are very happy to announce two training workshops for this years United Kingdom conference. The trainings will be given by Doug Neiner, Ralph Whitbeck and Mike Hostetler of appendTo. The general admission tickets for the conference are now sold out but you can buy conference/training bundles and still attend the conference.

appendTo

appendTo will be giving Introduction to jQuery and jQuery Mobile workshops. The workshops will be held on Thursday, 9 February, 2012 at the Lady Margaret Hall in Oxford, UK.

Introduction to jQuery

jQuery has become the most popular JavaScript library for developers because of it’s easy to learn and write. This course takes students through the basics of jQuery focused front-end development. This material is meant to establish a core foundation for developers. With a solid basis of jQuery and JavaScript understanding a developer will feel confident that they can add richness to their web applications.

jQuery Topics Covered*

  • Introduction
  • Find Something, Do Something
  • The jQuery Function
  • The jQuery Object
  • Events/Ajax/more…

* Topics subject to change

Price for the Introduction to jQuery workshop is £320 + VAT which includes a conference pass, £160 + VAT for just the training.

jQuery Mobile

jQuery mobile has gained undeniable press as a possible great solution to mobile web development. With a progressive enhancement approach jQuery mobile aims to allow a mobile web experience for all, while rewarding those with mobile devices capable of a rich experience.

This training will cover a comprehensive review of the jQuery Mobile Framework, walking through all of its new features and functionalities available to build robust and cross-platform mobile sites. The entire API will covered along with examples of how to use each component to its fullest potential.

The training concludes with a walk through of the construction of a jQuery Mobile application from scratch, all the way through to compiling a native version of the application with PhoneGap.

Topics Covered*

  • The state of the mobile web
  • jQuery Mobile Feature Overview
  • Building a jQuery Mobile application from scratch
  • Go native with jQuery Mobile + PhoneGap

* Topics subject to change

Price for the jQuery Mobile workshop is £420 + VAT which includes a conference pass, £270 + VAT for just the training.

The training workshops will be held on 9 February, 2012 at the Lady Margaret Hall and not at the Saïd Business School where the conference will be held.