The State of jQuery 2013

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My fellow web developers, the state of jQuery is strong.

On January 14, 2006, John Resig attended BarCampNYC and made a presentation about his new project called jQuery. In a contemporary blog post John said, “This code revolutionizes the way you can get JavaScript to interact with HTML.” It was a bold statement, but in retrospect we know it was an understatement.

Seven years after John introduced jQuery to the world, the JavaScript library he created has continued to evolve. Today, jQuery is used by more than half of the top 100,000 sites and is the most popular JavaScript library by far.

Last year, jQuery projects moved from under the wing of the Software Freedom Conservancy to our own non-profit organization: The jQuery Foundation. This new Foundation was created not just to foster jQuery code projects, but to advocate for the needs of web developers everywhere. We’re starting to see the fruits of that labor.

To serve the evolving needs of web developers, jQuery has grown far beyond the core library. jQuery UI provides a rich set of user interface widgets that share a consistent and common set of events, programming conventions, and visual styles. jQuery Mobile offers a framework designed to simplify web site and HTML app development on mobile devices. Additional jQuery Foundation projects such as Sizzle, QUnit, and TestSwarm provide valuable components and tools for web development.

Anniversary Announcements

During the coming two weeks you’ll hear more about each of these jQuery Foundation initiatives:

jQuery 1.9 final: This latest version of jQuery core provides support for a full spectrum of browsers, from IE6 all the way to the most recent releases of every major browser.

jQuery 2.0 beta: Here is your taste of the future, a jQuery that can be faster and smaller without the need to support IE 6, 7, or 8. It’s a great choice for platform-specific HTML applications.

jQuery Migrate 1.0 final: Use this plugin to find things that may cause upgrade issues when you move up from older jQuery versions, and to allow older code to work with either jQuery 1.9 or 2.0.

jQuery UI 1.10 final: This version of jQuery UI includes API redesigns for both the Dialog and Progressbar components, in addition to a healthy set of fixes to other components.

New and remodeled web sites: All jQuery sites are being updated with a new look, and we’re encouraging contributions via Github. The most exciting news of all? The Plugin site returns!

Conferences: Our next conference is being held in Portland Oregon on June 12-14, so save the date! Ticket sales and a call for speakers will open on January 25th at noon Eastern time. Details of future conferences are coming soon; they include Austin Texas in September 2013, San Diego California in February 2014, and Chicago Illinois in July 2014.

Membership: Our new program lets you or your company show support by donating to the jQuery Foundation; you’ll get benefits such as t-shirts, hoodies, and discounts on conference tickets.

jQuery’s Mission

With the impending arrival of jQuery 2.0 some people have been asking, “If jQuery doesn’t have to worry about IE 6, 7 or 8 anymore, where does it go now? Aren’t cross-browser issues the whole reason for jQuery’s existence?”

First of all, let’s be very clear: The jQuery team does “worry about” IE 6/7/8, with jQuery 1.9. We’ve created a legacy-free jQuery 2.0 in order to address the many situations where older versions of IE aren’t needed. Some glorious day in the future, jQuery 2.0 will be the only version you’ll need; until then we’ll continue to maintain jQuery 1.9.

Second, jQuery wasn’t just created to iron out browser differences. It introduced a concise, powerful, and expressive API for managing HTML documents that is far better than the original W3C DOM APIs. Using the jQuery API, developers have created reusable jQuery plugins that make the process of building a web site or HTML application much easier. jQuery is a great choice even for an iPhone HTML app that will never see a different web platform.

But to the point about cross-browser issues, it’s a complete myth that today’s modern browsers have no differences. Look through the jQuery source code and you’ll see plenty of places where it has to fix, patch, and mask issues in modern browsers; those problems didn’t end with IE8. jQuery 2.0 now has more patches and shims for Chrome, Safari, and Firefox than for Internet Explorer!

In fixing and patching these differences, we often act as an advocate for web developers to the browser makers and standards organizations. We want jQuery APIs to be consistent and return useful results, even when browser bugs or ill-conceived standards dictate otherwise. It’s not always easy to do that.

Sometimes, doing the right thing requires changes to the standards, or new standards altogether. For some examples of that, see the work Mike Sherov has done to fix getComputedStyle(), or the efforts of Mat Marquis and others to create a responsive image tag. Team members Yehuda Katz and Rick Waldron are participating in the W3C and ECMA standards groups that define the technologies we all use.

Let’s Work Together

All of these benefits to the web development community are delivered by a dedicated group of jQuery team members. We’re proud to have developers like these working on behalf of the jQuery Foundation to advocate for the needs of the community. The majority of the team volunteers their time, or has their time subsidized through the generous donation of their employer. But there is always more work to do than the team can possibly tackle. Here are ways you can help:

Join the jQuery Foundation. As a member, you’ll get an awesome annual membership gift such as a t-shirt, hoodie, or bag, depending on your level of contribution. Your cash donations can help to keep our operations going. We’ll be announcing a memebership program in a few days as part of our anniversary celebration.

Test beta versions of jQuery projects as soon as they arrive. We want to find and fix problems before the final release. Beta versions are announced on the jQuery blogs, and bug reporting procedures are given in the blog posts as well. Read through the documentation and let us know when information is incorrect or missing. As Linus’ Law says, “Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.”

Write code, documentation, or web sites for a jQuery project. It’s not just the libraries themselves that need volunteers. The jQuery Foundation has many, many web sites at this point, and those sites always need contributions of code, documentation, or design. Watch for a blog post soon about a new site for contributors.

Get your company involved. If your company encourages employees to do open source work, consider doing that work on jQuery Foundation projects. Companies that wish to provide services and/or financial support can become corporate members of the jQuery Foundation.

Share your knowledge with the jQuery community. Join the discussion on our jQuery forum, on Stack Overflow, at user-group gatherings and conferences, or anywhere else you find jQuery being the hot topic.

Thank You!

As you can tell, the jQuery Foundation was very busy in 2012, and we’re determined to continue that pace in 2013.

We couldn’t have made such incredible progress without support from members and sponsors. jQuery Foundation member companies include WordPress, Media Temple, Adobe, RIM, Apigee, Intel, Gentics, BNOTIONS, White October, Bitovi, Davinci, Application Craft, GitHub, Go Daddy and MJG International. Significant support has also been provided by Bocoup, Filament Group, and their staff.

jQuery’s success isn’t ours alone; the web development community around the world deserves much of the credit. The breadth and scope of the jQuery ecosystem shows that it is thriving, and it continues to grow thanks to your support. Let’s make 2013 another great year for web developers!

Dave Methvin
President, jQuery Foundation

jQuery 1.9 RC1 and Migrate RC1 Released

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Drop everything and start testing, jQuery 1.9 Release Candidate 1 is now available! Today we’re also releasing RC1 of the jQuery Migrate plugin, to help in migrating and upgrading your older jQuery code and plugins. We really need your help to make sure this code is free of bugs and ready to release.

The jQuery 1.9RC1 files are available on jQuery’s CDN. We recommend that you start by including the jQuery Migrate plugin. Be sure to check the browser’s console for warnings, which all start with JQMIGRATE and are described in the plugin’s documentation. Just replace your current jQuery include with this:

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.0rc1.js"></script>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-migrate-1.0.0rc1.js"></script>

For diagnostic purposes, you can also include the jQuery Migrate plugin with versions of jQuery all the way back to 1.6.4 to see what changes may cause issues with your code when you do upgrade. At minimum, please test your site with your existing jQuery version and the jQuery Migrate plugin to see what it reports. Our goal is to make the jQuery Migrate plugin into a tool that can smooth out any bumps in your upgrade road.

If you haven’t looked at the previous 1.9 beta, check out the jQuery 1.9 Upgrade Guide for information about what has changed in this go-round. There’s been quite a bit of API cleanup in 1.9, and the jQuery Migrate plugin is your friend when it comes to finding issues.

In the last beta we introduced a powerful CSS array getter that simplifies and optimizes getting multiple properties. But then we looked, and oh, I dunno, it seemed like this release just needed to “pop” more. So we added more features to make your development life easier.

New! Sizzle Selectors

Sizzle now supports the following additional CSS3 selectors: :nth-last-child, :nth-of-type, :nth-last-of-type, :first-of-type, :last-of-type, :only-of-type, :target, :root, and :lang. That means all those selectors are usable in every browser jQuery supports all the way back to IE6, regardless of native browser support for the selector. There are only three remaining selectors unsupported by Sizzle/jQuery (:link, :visited, and :hover) which we won’t implement due to the overhead of events that would be required to track active elements.

New! .finish() Method

jQuery animations have gotten even better, and our API improved in the process. It all started with a suggestion to eliminate the Boolean trap posed by the .stop(Boolean, Boolean) signature. During that discussion it became clear that we didn’t have a way to handle one of the most useful cases: running all queued animations to their final value. So we added one, .finish(). The best way to show its benefits is with an example.

As you can see from the example, most uses of the .stop() API requiring Boolean arguments can be replaced with some combination of .stop() (with no arguments), .clearQueue() and/or .finish() and be less cryptic. We’re not removing the old behavior though, so any existing code should work fine. We’d prefer that you use .finish() when appropriate, since it reads better and avoids confusing Boolean parameters. And, when you need to go to the end of a whole series of animations, .finish() will do that in 1.9 when nothing would before.

New! Source Maps

jQuery 1.9RC1 has added the ability to use source maps in browsers that support them. At the moment that’s just Google Chrome, but Mozilla Firefox is planning support as well.

What’s all this about? Well imagine that you are using compressed versions of your files on your production site, including a compressed version of jQuery. You get a report that an important customer is running into a problem. You could debug it a lot easier if you had the uncompressed source, but using that on your high-traffic production site isn’t an option. With source maps, you can let the browser’s debugger “map” the lines in the compressed file into the uncompressed source. That makes it so much easier to set breakpoints, inspect or change values, and see meaningful variable names. This video gives you a taste of what it can do.

The jQuery CDN has the map files for this beta version; the jQuery, Google, and Microsoft CDN versions of jQuery final releases will also get matching source maps from now on. If you are using jQuery 1.9 or 2.0 from the CDN, just check the “Use source maps” option in the debugger and you will be set. Open the uncompressed version of jQuery in the Chrome debugger and you can set breakpoints or inspect variable values there, even though the compressed version is being used!

When hosting your own copy of jQuery, copy the map to your server and use it from there. For simplicity we assume that the compressed and uncompressed copy of jQuery is in the same folder as the map file; this is the case for CDN versions and you should follow the same rule if you make local copies. The map file name is the same as the compressed version, with .map replacing .js. Do not rename the files when you copy them. So, if you were to use a local copy of jquery-1.9.0.min.js the corresponding map file would be jquery-1.9.0.min.map and the uncompressed file would be jquery-1.9.0.js in the same folder.

Congrats, Contributors!

Many thanks to the people who have contributed to the 1.9 release: Akintayo Akinwunmi, Alexander Farkas, Allen J Schmidt Jr, Ben Truyman, Bennett Sorbo, Callum Macrae, Carl Danley, Corey Frang, Daniel Gálvez, Dan Morgan, David Bonner, David Fox, Devin Cooper, Elijah Manor, Erick Ruiz de Chavez, Greg Lavallee, Ismail Khair, James Huston, Jay Merrifield, Jonathan Sampson, Julian Aubourg, Marcel Greter, Matt Farmer, Matthias Jäggli, Mike Petrovich, Mike Sherov, Oleg Gaidarenko, Paul Ramos, Richard Gibson, Rick Waldron, Rod Vagg, Roland Eckl, Sai Wong, Scott González, Sebi Burkhard, Timmy Willison, Timo Tijhof, Tom Fuertes, Toyama Nao, and Yi Ming He.

jQuery 1.9.0RC1 Changelog

Ajax

  • #12004: Rename ajax.type to ajax.method
  • #12550: jQuery Ajax cache=false doesn't always work

Attributes

  • #9905: .removeAttr( "id" ) sometimes crashes IE 7
  • #10299: hrefNormalized === false also needs a propHook
  • #12048: [IE6/7/8] xml set attribute
  • #12584: jQuery wrongly serializes &lt;select&gt; with one disabled &lt;option&gt;
  • #12600: jQuery('select').is('[value="value"]') works inconsistently depending on number of elements returned
  • #12945: attr throws exception in IE9 on Flash &lt;object&gt;s
  • #13011: Setting type attribute on an input doesn't work as intended

Build

  • #12254: Reflected XSS
  • #12490: Move submodule update process to grunt
  • #12725: Avoid localized UTF-8 characters in intro.js @DATE
  • #12741: inconsistent line endings in official jquery-1.8.2.js download
  • #12886: Add source map support for build
  • #13044: Execute all QUnit modules in TestSwarm
  • #13064: Improve test suite fixture cleanup

Core

  • #9469: Remove semi-functional .selector calculation from .pushStack()
  • #9904: Move deprecated functionality to compatibility plugin
  • #10417: jQuery.later
  • #11290: selector interpreted as HTML
  • #11737: Remove jQuery.sub
  • #12107: Change proxy to allow arguments currying without overwriting context
  • #12134: implement HTML5 compilant form data construction into $.fn.serialzeArray
  • #12191: jQuery.type() should return "error" for native ECMAScript Error objects
  • #12519: Public API methods should not have private arguments
  • #12840: Remove (private) parameter "pass" from jQuery.attr and jQuery.access
  • #13021: each() cannot work well with a literal object who has a length member
  • #13075: Performance optimization for $.type
  • #13076: Performance optimization (10-30%) for $("some-selector")

Css

  • #11938: jQuery.css should accept an array to get multiple properties
  • #12990: 'px' automatically added to column-count css property
  • #13088: under IE8, $(selector).attr('style') always return lowercase string

Data

  • #10544: Remove ALL special meanings of "." in keys for $.fn.data

Deferred

  • #11405: deferred.notify() invokes progressCallbacks with deferred as context
  • #13160: Deferred.then doesn't propagete custom context

Effects

  • #12803: Smarter hook point for jQuery.timer

Event

  • #3827: Checkbox state inconsistent in click event handler
  • #12061: $(window).beforeunload() clobbers previous handler and return values
  • #12518: Don't use offsetWidth in jQuery.event.trigger()
  • #12610: jQuery.event.dispatch should remove window.event
  • #12736: Move pseudo:hover to jquery-compat / deprecated.js
  • #12739: Name: Passing in an Event to trigger strips namespace
  • #12827: Remove "exclusive" events
  • #12828: Remove event properties: attrChange attrName relatedNode srcElement

Manipulation

  • #4087: insertAfter, insertBefore, etc do not work when destination is original element
  • #9646: IE7: Cloning of form-elements and changing their names also changes the name of the elements that are cloned.
  • #10470: wrap() evaluates scripts
  • #11226: .after and .before returns incorrect data for $('not_existing_element')
  • #11230: .appendTo .prependTo .insertAfter .insertBefore returns incorrect data for $('not_existing_element')
  • #11280: appending elements to an object element fails in IE &lt; 9
  • #11795: Resolve script manipulation/execution inconsistencies
  • #12120: Inconsistency of .end() with respect to .after()
  • #12336: Calling $('#select').empty() should set options length to 0
  • #12392: Elements created from HTML strings have a parentNode
  • #12449: replaceWith() doesn't clone elements where required
  • #12503: before/after will choke if collection has not first disconnected node
  • #12777: Applets don't work when appended on IE
  • #12863: behavior:url(#default#savehistory) causes event error on oldIE
  • #12957: Improve wrapMap
  • #13019: New pre-1.9 .replaceWith() behavior leaks data and events
  • #13094: If to jQuery#before passed function argument it should receive index of the current element in the set

Misc

  • #12758: Make sure Summit new authors are credited

Offset

  • #6446: Mobile Safari 4.0.4: $.offset.top() reports wrong position after scroll

Selector

  • #11115: ".is()" and ".filter()" disagree on attribute selector "[checked]"
  • #12856: Syntax error, unrecognized expression in jquery 1.8+
  • #13070: filter()/is() does not work correctly with attribute equals selector which contains special characters

Support

  • #12569: Improve feature detect for oldIE event bubbling
  • #12869: Support tests affect page layout in IE8/9/10 running in IE7 mode

Traversing

  • #12009: jQueryObject.find(element) corrupts the stack
  • #12816: .find can return elements in the wrong order

jQuery 1.9 Beta 1 Released

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You’ve been good boys and girls this year, so look what Santa left under the source tree: jQuery 1.9 Beta 1! We’ve made a lot of changes this time, so we need your help in testing more than ever. Please don’t leave us feeling awkward at the holiday party with that punch bowl full of warm eggnog and the creepy guy from accounting. Just take a few minutes out of your holiday schedule and try this with your code. It’s a gift we will definitely appreciate.

jQuery 1.9 has removed many of the items we deprecated during the last few versions of jQuery. For that reason, we’re introducing the jQuery Migrate plugin. This plugin restores several of the deprecated and removed features so that existing code can run, without changing the code. However, it’s intended as a short-term stopgap and shouldn’t be used for new work. To make migration easier, the development version (linked below) also provides browser console warnings to let you know which obsolete features the code is still using. See the plugin documentation for a list of messages you may see.

To test, we recommend that you start with the jQuery Migrate plugin since it will warn you about any deprecated features the code may depend on. Just include these two script tags in your code, replacing your existing jQuery script include:

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.0b1.js"></script>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-migrate-1.0.0b1.js"></script>

Be sure to update to the most recent versions of jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile if you are also using them.

If the browser’s console does not show any “JQMIGRATE” warning messages generated by the jQuery Migrate plugin, try removing the jquery-migrate include and try jQuery 1.9 in all its squeaky-clean glory. If you have questions, feedback, or complaints about the beta that aren’t specifically bugs, let us know in the jQuery Forum.

Issues regarding the migration plugin not discussed below or in the upgrade guide can be reported at the jQuery Migrate Issue tracker; include a test case that we can use to diagnose the problem. The best way to do that is create a simple test at jsFiddle.net or jsbin.com. You can this jsFiddle tempate or jsbin template as a starting point; they already contain links to the work-in-progress versions of both jQuery and the jQuery Migrate plugin. Add your code there and post a link to it with your bug report.

If you’re seeing problems after fixing any migration issues, removing jQuery Migrate, and using the 1.9 beta by itself, you can report them at the main jQuery core bug tracker. A test case is essential here as well so that we can analyze the problem. Again, if you have questions, feedback, or complaints about the beta that aren’t specifically bug reports, use the jQuery Forum.

What’s New

The majority of work in 1.9 has revolved around API cleanup. Changes most likely to affect existing code are listed in the jQuery 1.9 Upgrade Guide, and these changes will also carry over to 2.0. The jQuery Migrate plugin will identify many of these issues for you automatically, so it’s good to use the plugin in your initial testing to see if it identifies anything that needs to be changed.

We couldn’t let a version like this escape without adding at least one new feature; it’s a good one.

$(element).css([ name1, name2 … ]): This is a new getter that retrieves multiple CSS properties for the first element in a collection and returns them as an object with properties. In addition to the shorter code, this signature provides up to 25 percent better performance because it can use the same return value from the browser’s `.getComputedStyle()` method rather calling the method for each css property. Typical use might be like this:

var dims = $("#box").css([ "width", "height", "backgroundColor" ]);
//  { width: "10px", height: "20px", backgroundColor: "#D00DAD" }

Finally, no major version would be complete without fixes for a variety of bugs and peculiar edge cases that you’ve discovered and reported on the bug tracker. Those, along with all the other modifications, are all cataloged in the changelog below.

How It’s Made

Possibly the most exciting news of this beta is that so many contributors — new and veteran — worked to make jQuery better. Our first jQuery Developer Summit in October brought in some incredibly skilled developers that we hope will continue to stay with us, and several new contributors dared to tackle bugs that have been open for more than a year! If you’re interested, you can help out too.

Let’s give a round of applause to the people who contributed their code gifts to this 1.9 beta: Akintayo Akinwunmi, Alexander Farkas, Allen J Schmidt Jr, Ben Truyman, Bennett Sorbo, Callum Macrae, Carl Danley, Corey Frang, Daniel Gálvez, Dan Morgan, David Bonner, David Fox, Devin Cooper, Elijah Manor, Erick Ruiz de Chavez, Greg Lavallee, Ismail Khair, James Huston, Jay Merrifield, Jonathan Sampson, Julian Aubourg, Marcel Greter, Matt Farmer, Matthias Jäggli, Mike Petrovich, Mike Sherov, Oleg Gaidarenko, Paul Ramos, Richard Gibson, Rick Waldron, Rod Vagg, Roland Eckl, Sai Wong, Scott González, Timmy Willison, Timo Tijhof, Tom Fuertes, and Yi Ming He. If you happen to see them under the mistletoe … well, you know what to do.

jQuery 1.9 Beta 1 Change Log

Ajax

  • #12004: Rename ajax.type to ajax.method
  • #12550: jQuery Ajax cache=false doesn't always work

Attributes

  • #10299: hrefNormalized === false also needs a propHook
  • #12048: [IE6/7/8] xml set attribute
  • #12584: jQuery wrongly serializes select with one disabled option
  • #12600: jQuery('select').is('[value="value"]') works inconsistently depending on number of elements returned
  • #13011: Setting type attribute on an input doesn't work as intended

Build

  • #12254: Reflected XSS
  • #12490: Move submodule update process to grunt
  • #12725: Avoid localized UTF-8 characters in intro.js @DATE
  • #13044: Execute all QUnit modules in TestSwarm
  • #13064: Improve test suite fixture cleanup

Core

  • #9469: Remove semi-functional .selector calculation from .pushStack()
  • #9904: Move deprecated functionality to compatibility plugin
  • #10417: jQuery.later
  • #11290: selector interpreted as HTML
  • #11737: Remove jQuery.sub
  • #12107: Change proxy to allow arguments currying without overwriting context
  • #12134: implement HTML5 compilant form data construction into $.fn.serialzeArray
  • #12191: jQuery.type() should return "error" for native ECMAScript Error objects
  • #12519: Public API methods should not have private arguments
  • #12840: Remove (private) parameter "pass" from jQuery.attr and jQuery.access
  • #13021: each() cannot work well with a literal object who has a length member

Css

  • #11938: jQuery.css should accept an array to get multiple properties
  • #12990: 'px' automatically added to column-count css property

Data

  • #10544: Remove ALL special meanings of "." in keys for $.fn.data

Deferred

  • #11405: deferred.notify() invokes progressCallbacks with deferred as context

Effects

  • #12803: Smarter hook point for jQuery.timer

Event

  • #3827: Checkbox state inconsistent in click event handler
  • #12061: $(window).beforeunload() clobbers previous handler and return values
  • #12518: Don't use offsetWidth in jQuery.event.trigger()
  • #12610: jQuery.event.dispatch should remove window.event
  • #12736: Move pseudo:hover to jquery-compat / deprecated.js
  • #12739: Name: Passing in an Event to trigger strips namespace
  • #12827: Remove "exclusive" events
  • #12828: Remove event properties: attrChange attrName relatedNode srcElement

Manipulation

  • #4087: insertAfter, insertBefore, etc do not work when destination is original element
  • #9646: IE7: Cloning of form-elements and changing their names also changes the name of the elements that are cloned.
  • #10470: wrap() evaluates scripts
  • #11226: .after and .before returns incorrect data for $('not_existing_element')
  • #11230: .appendTo .prependTo .insertAfter .insertBefore returns incorrect data for $('not_existing_element')
  • #11280: appending elements to an object element fails in IE &lt; 9
  • #11795: Resolve script manipulation/execution inconsistencies
  • #12120: Inconsistency of .end() with respect to .after()
  • #12392: Elements created from HTML strings have a parentNode
  • #12449: replaceWith() doesn't clone elements where required
  • #12503: before/after will choke if collection has not first disconnected node
  • #12777: Applets don't work when appended on IE
  • #12957: Improve wrapMap
  • #13013: Move jQuery.buildFragment() to compat plugin
  • #13019: New pre-1.9 .replaceWith() behavior leaks data and events

Misc

  • #12758: Make sure Summit new authors are credited

Offset

  • #6446: Mobile Safari 4.0.4: $.offset.top() reports wrong position after scroll

Selector

  • #11115: ".is()" and ".filter()" disagree on attribute selector "[checked]"
  • #12856: Syntax error, unrecognized expression in jquery 1.8+

Support

  • #12869: Support tests affect page layout in IE8/9/10 running in IE7 mode

Traversing

  • #12009: jQueryObject.find(element) corrupts the stack
  • #12816: .find can return elements in the wrong order

NOTE: Please do not report bugs or other problems via blog comments!

jQuery Color 2.1.1 Released

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Just a quick announcement: jQuery Color 2.1.1 is now released! This adds a few bug fixes to the 2.1.0 release and I would suggest upgrading as soon as possible to avoid encountering these bugs.

Changelog

  • Ensure white and black both have a saturation of 0 to keep them in greyscale color space.
  • Add support for ‘.25′ instead of ‘0.25’ for alpha string parsing

Download

Thanks!

Special thanks going out to Mike Sherov, Ben Olson, Dmitry, and antoniojrod for helping with this release!

Issues

As always, if you encounter any issues, please do not post replys on this blog post, instead visit jquery-color issues on github.

jQuery 1.8.3 Released

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Woo hoo, Thanksgiving arrived early this year! jQuery 1.8.3 is available for download. You can get it here:

We’ve notified the Google and Microsoft CDNs as well; we trust they will endeavor to post these files tout de suite. The complete change log for jQuery 1.8.3 is below. It’s a rather modest list, but we did nail a few important bugs and regressions.

The team is already hard at work on jQuery 1.9 and would like to squash as many bugs as possible. To report a problem, please post a bug report and be sure to include a test case from jsfiddle.net or jsbin.com. Also try our work-in-progress build at http://code.jquery.com/jquery-git.js to see if it’s already fixed.

Many thanks to the patch contributors for this version; ye shall know them by their GitHub handles: gnarf37, timmywil, gibson042, rwldrn, joyvuu-dave, jaubourg, staabm, and sindresorhus. In addition, we thank all the community members who took the time to contribute quality bug reports with test cases. Your initial groundwork makes it possible for us to find and fix bugs.

jQuery 1.8.3 Change Log

Ajax

  • #12583: IE8 HTML bug (Chinese translation)
  • #12635: jquery 1.8.2 fails ajax calls in IE9 because it assumes cross domain when default port is in ajax url

Attributes

  • #10943: JQuery 1.7.1 does not properly set tabindex property on cloned element in IE7

Core

  • #12690: Minimum JS File Contains non-ASCII Character

Css

  • #10227: $('body').show() does'nt work if body style is set to display:none
  • #12537: element.css('filter') returns undefined in IE9

Deferred

  • #12665: Callbacks objects with "unique" flag will iterate over a function's methods when it is added a second time

Effects

  • #8685: Animations should keep track of animation state in order to properly address stacked animations
  • #12497: jQuery 1.8.1 transitions crashing android 2.3.4 browser
  • #12837: All animations break after zooming a lightbox on the iPad

Selector

  • #12643: Upgrade from 1.3.2 to 1.8.2 gives an Uncaught TypeError
  • #12648: Can not correctly detect focus for DIVs with contenteditable in Chrome and Safari

Support

  • #12357: jQuery 1.8.0 Not parseable by XUL Runner Applications

jQuery Developer Summit Recap

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With much of the East Coast bracing for the impact of Hurricane Sandy, now’s certainly a good time to take a look back on some sunnier times. Two weeks ago today, the jQuery Foundation held the first-ever jQuery Developer Summit at the Aol Campus in Dulles, Va. After a brief morning overview of our major tools and processes, over 120 team and community members set to work on nearly every aspect of our projects. We divided into 18 teams and focused on everything from triaging and fixing bugs and documentation for jQuery Core, UI, and Mobile, to working on design, implementation and deployment of our entire network of sites, to improving our automated testing and gathering and analysis of metrics on how people use our libraries and websites.

In addition to closing (and opening) hundreds of issues and tickets, and making hundreds of commits to repositories across our entire organization, it seemed that everyone in attendance, from grizzled old hands to greenhorn contributors, learned a lot. We were happy to celebrate a lot of firsts, whether it was somebody’s first commit on a jQuery repository, or their first git commit, period. Of course, not everything went off without a hitch, and we’ve been gathering feedback and figuring out how we can do even better next time.

What that means, of course, is that there will be a next time!  With such an incredible energy in the room for the two days, and a new group of contributors digging in on all of our projects, we’re certainly looking forward to another go-round. Watch this space and follow @jqcon for updates on the Developer Summit and all our other events. In the meantime, check out these recaps from Andy Couch and Carl Danley, and photos from Bowling for jQuery!

And finally, we’d like to extend a hearty thanks to each and every one of you who joined us for two days to help out and participate, we could not have done it without you! Thank you!

jQuery 1.8.2 Released

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We’re pleased to announce that jQuery 1.8.2 is available! This version fixes several bugs and performance regressions reported from the past couple of releases, and we think the 1.8 line is pretty solid at this point. The only way to know for sure that it works with your code is to test it–so please do!

As always, we have put out the jQuery-shaped signal lights; the master control centers at the Google and Microsoft CDNs are on high alert and will soon post these files. For immediate relief, please use the copies above. If you find a problem, please post a bug report and be sure to include a test case from jsfiddle.net or jsbin.com.

The complete change log for jQuery 1.8.2 is below. If this is your first upgrade to the 1.8 line, be sure to read the blog entries for 1.8.0 and 1.8.1 to see what’s changed.

Many thanks to the patch contributors for this version; ye shall know them by their GitHub handles: timmywil, gibson042, rwldrn, joyvuu-dave, jaubourg, staabm, and sindresorhus. In addition, we thank all the community members who took the time to contribute quality bug reports with test cases. Your initial groundwork makes it possible for us to find and fix bugs.

jQuery 1.8.2 Change Log

Deferred

  • #12521: Deferred.promise( target) only works fine when typeof( target)=='object'

Event

  • #12423: jQuery breaks with Comcast Protection Guard and any anti-keylogging protection software on IE7+
  • #12436: Performance degradation with delegate events and pseudo-classes

Misc

  • #12229: Some inconsistencies/optimizations

Offset

  • #12534: .offset() throws an error on BlackBerry5 and iOS3
  • #12536: Make .offset() calc less wrong on browsers w/o getBoundingClientRect

Selector

  • #12303: Attribute selector fails if the attribute value contains :first :last
  • #12337: :nth-child selector not accurate after new child element added
  • #12361: seleter has bug
  • #12448: :contains() edge case throwing an error
  • #12492: In textarea focus event handler, $(this).is(':focus') == false in Chrome & Safari
  • #12523: JQuery renders line breaks as text nodes
  • #12526: :last selector fails to find a match
  • #12541: 1.8.0 and 1.8.1: Double :not() selector fails in IE6/7
  • #12572: :contains breaks searching iframes v1.8

Traversing

  • #12474: Using find on a collection with append does not return the correct elements

jQuery UK 2013

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jQuery UK is back for 2013!

The jQuery Foundation is pleased to announce that White October are organising another jQuery UK  conference in Oxford, UK on the 19th of April 2013.

There is a call for papers and suggestions for speakers are also welcome. So if you want to take part, or want to see someone at jQuery UK you know what to do.

A very small number of tickets are on sale until the call for papers finishes on the 11th of October for a “blind bird” price of £130 + VAT.

The full speaker lineup should be announced winter 2012 and the early bird tickets will go on sale at the same time for £160 + VAT.

We’ve also listed it on Lanyrd.com if you’d like to follow along there!

jQuery Licensing Changes

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Some important changes have occurred in the latest releases of several jQuery projects such as core, UI, Mobile, Sizzle, and QUnit. You may not have noticed them because they didn’t really change the actual code, documentation, or functionality. Instead, these changes were designed to clarify the ownership and licensing of the software. If you’re not a lawyer, most of this won’t make a lot of difference to you, but it’s important to us.

One simplification we made was to remove the GNU General Public License (GPL), leaving only the MIT License. Having just one license option makes things easier for the Foundation to manage and eliminates confusion that existed about the Foundation’s previous dual-licensing policy. However, this doesn’t affect your ability to use any of the Foundation’s projects. You are still free to take a jQuery Foundation project, make changes, and re-license it under the GPL if your situation makes that desirable. The Free Software Foundation site confirms that the MIT License is a “lax, permissive non-copyleft free software license, compatible with the GNU GPL.”

Over time, more than 500 people have contributed to the projects currently managed by the jQuery Foundation. We’re working hard to make sure that everyone who has contributed gets the credit they deserve. Many of the projects now have an AUTHORS.txt file in their root that list all the major contributors in chronological order. Scott González did a lot of the heavy lifting to get the author lists in order, and created useful tools so that we can keep them that way. Of course, you can always see the author of a specific change to a project by looking at the commit in the git log or on GitHub.

It’s important to the jQuery Foundation that licensing of the code and documentation is clear, so the community can continue to use it without interruption. Doing so requires a “paper trail” so it is unambiguous that the Foundation has permission to use the code and the contributor had the ability to contribute that code in the first place. For an example of the latter, think about the situation where an employee works on jQuery Foundation projects at the company office; their employer might claim they own that work and the employee had no right to license it to the Foundation.

To make the licensing clear, contributors are asked to sign a Contributor License Agreement (CLA). jQuery team members will sign a Copyright Assignment Agreement (CAA) which actually assigns the copyright to the jQuery Foundation. For more discussion of what a CLA or CAA does, see this article.

All of these changes guarantee that the jQuery Foundation’s open source projects will be dependable resources for developers and businesses. They also ensure that when you contribute, you’ll get some recognition for the work that you’ve done. So with all that legal stuff out of the way, come help us build the jQuery Foundation projects!

Help Us Money-ify UglifyJS 2.0

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In nature, an ecosystem consists of the organisms, raw materials, and all of the complex interactions that shape their shared environment. The open source ecosystem is no different. Each project has its niche, and any package that is a dependency of course has dependencies of its own. jQuery is used on millions of websites, but we wouldn’t be there without the excellent tools on which we rely to build, test, and distribute our code.

One such tool is Mihai Bazon’s excellent UglifyJS. We’ve been using Uglify to compress jQuery, jQuery UI, and jQuery Mobile for nearly two years now, so if you’ve used any of our minified builds recently, you’ve benefited from Mihai’s work. Recently, he began work on UglifyJS 2.0, which will feature even better compression, support for source maps, and a command line utility. He also announced a Pledgie campaign to support his efforts.

Here at the Foundation, our goal is not just to improve libraries that start with “jQuery,” but rather the entire JavaScript ecosystem in which we all participate. That’s why we’re happy today to announce some exciting news – and to issue a challenge!

Help build UglifyJS 2.0!
Click here to lend your support to: Funding development of UglifyJS 2.0 and make a donation at www.pledgie.com !

We’ve just kicked in 500€ to the campaign to recognize his work so far, but there’s more we all can do. If the community can help us to help Mihai reach his goal of 3,000€  by the end of September, we’ll donate an additional 500€ to the UglifyJS 2.0 project!

We’re looking forward to keeping you posted on the progress here, and participating in similar endeavors in the future to help improve the tools we use each day. In the meantime, thanks for considering a donation (even a small one), and if we haven’t convinced you yet, perhaps this final exhortation will: THINK OF THE BYTES!

Update (5:30): Awesome! The Dojo Foundation has matched our donation!