Volunteers Wanted: Trac Enhancements

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The jQuery and jQuery UI teams use Trac to do their bug reporting and tracking. The jQuery Core bug tracker could really use a Trac expert to migrate us to Trac 1.0 and fix a few nagging issues we’ve been having. If you’re an expert Trac-meister, or just someone with good Trac setup/configuration experience who’s up to the challenge, we’d love to talk with you! Send a message to dave(at)jquery.com and we’ll be in touch.

Since some of you will inevitably ask: GitHub’s integration between issues and commits is wonderful, but it’s not anywhere near as powerful as Trac when it comes to searching and reporting. In addition, our projects have more than seven years of history comprising thousands of bug reports with important data in them. That’s a non-trivial amount of data to import into GitHub issues and groom to be useful once it’s imported. We feel that staying with Trac is the lowest-effort way for us to give us the bug tracking abilities we need.

jQuery Licensing Changes

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Some important changes have occurred in the latest releases of several jQuery projects such as core, UI, Mobile, Sizzle, and QUnit. You may not have noticed them because they didn’t really change the actual code, documentation, or functionality. Instead, these changes were designed to clarify the ownership and licensing of the software. If you’re not a lawyer, most of this won’t make a lot of difference to you, but it’s important to us.

One simplification we made was to remove the GNU General Public License (GPL), leaving only the MIT License. Having just one license option makes things easier for the Foundation to manage and eliminates confusion that existed about the Foundation’s previous dual-licensing policy. However, this doesn’t affect your ability to use any of the Foundation’s projects. You are still free to take a jQuery Foundation project, make changes, and re-license it under the GPL if your situation makes that desirable. The Free Software Foundation site confirms that the MIT License is a “lax, permissive non-copyleft free software license, compatible with the GNU GPL.”

Over time, more than 500 people have contributed to the projects currently managed by the jQuery Foundation. We’re working hard to make sure that everyone who has contributed gets the credit they deserve. Many of the projects now have an AUTHORS.txt file in their root that list all the major contributors in chronological order. Scott González did a lot of the heavy lifting to get the author lists in order, and created useful tools so that we can keep them that way. Of course, you can always see the author of a specific change to a project by looking at the commit in the git log or on GitHub.

It’s important to the jQuery Foundation that licensing of the code and documentation is clear, so the community can continue to use it without interruption. Doing so requires a “paper trail” so it is unambiguous that the Foundation has permission to use the code and the contributor had the ability to contribute that code in the first place. For an example of the latter, think about the situation where an employee works on jQuery Foundation projects at the company office; their employer might claim they own that work and the employee had no right to license it to the Foundation.

To make the licensing clear, contributors are asked to sign a Contributor License Agreement (CLA). jQuery team members will sign a Copyright Assignment Agreement (CAA) which actually assigns the copyright to the jQuery Foundation. For more discussion of what a CLA or CAA does, see this article.

All of these changes guarantee that the jQuery Foundation’s open source projects will be dependable resources for developers and businesses. They also ensure that when you contribute, you’ll get some recognition for the work that you’ve done. So with all that legal stuff out of the way, come help us build the jQuery Foundation projects!

Official Plugins: A Change in The Roadmap

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Barely six months ago, we announced that we were adopting three plugins developed chiefly at Microsoft – Templating, Data Link, and Globalization – as official plugins, to be developed in accordance with the standards of and supported by the jQuery project. Today, we’d like to take an opportunity to share what we’ve learned in the interim and announce a change in course for these and the rest of jQuery’s “Official Plugins.”

There never has been a dedicated jQuery team for supporting Official Plugins. Prior to the adoption of Microsoft’s contributions, the plugins that the jQuery project supported – Color, Easing, bgiframe, Mousewheel, Metadata, and Cookie – were dead-simple, effective plugins for achieving a particular utilitarian end. They required little maintenance, stalwartly serving with little fuss from version to version of jQuery core. In recent months, as we noticed an uptick in questions related to the three new plugins, we realized there was a disconnect. Though development on beta versions of the plugins continued at Microsoft, the planned jQuery sub-team that was meant to collaborate with and adopt Microsoft’s work never formed.

As demand has grown, based on the existence of the beta versions of the plugins as well as promises made in the posts, we’ve sensed the rumbles, the confusion, and the confused exclamations: “I thought templating was going to be in 1.5!” Because of your concerns and ours, we’ve decided to eliminate the notion of Official Plugins altogether. It’s a difference that’s both semantic and symbolic, but this is its material impact:

Many of the original supported jQuery plugins (Color, Easing, and Mousewheel) will continue to be supported and maintained by the jQuery Core Dev Team. The Metadata plugin will be deprecated, in favor of similar functionality provided by jQuery 1.4.3 and above. The Cookie plugin will continue to be maintained by Klaus Hartl.

The jQuery UI project will take ownership over plugins on which it has a current or future dependency: Templating, Globalization, and bgiframe. The jQuery UI team plans to begin work anew on templating and globalization, starting with the normal process for UI plugins: Collaborative development on a spec. While some may perceive this as a setback, given existing progress on the current jquery-tmpl plugin, it is really an opportunity for us to work in tandem with the community — Microsoft included — to develop an implementation that will be effective and flexible. The “official plugins” Microsoft has been developing have always been in a beta state, subject to change and with significant revisions planned for the Beta 2 release, but we recognize (and appreciate) those of you who have jumped in and started to experiment and use them in your applications. The UI team is still in the early planning stages for the Templating and Globalization plugins, and we invite you to visit the planning wiki and share your thoughts about development.

Microsoft will continue to develop and support the Data Link plugin independently, and will take ownership of hosting the documentation for the existing plugins.  In the short term, however, we’ll keep the documentation for these plugins on api.jquery.com, in order preserve a reference for anyone who needs it. For more on Microsoft’s plans for Data Link, please read their Official Plugins Update. We value Microsoft’s ongoing contribution to jQuery, providing developer time and financial support for a number of efforts, including the jQuery UI Grid and the jQuery conferences.

We realize that some of these details may seem in flux or merely organizational, but we know that it’s important to tell the community of changes like these as they’re happening so that you can make the best decisions for your applications as soon as possible. We hope you understand why we’ve had to make these shifts and encourage you to get involved and help us push these important projects along!

Addendum: So Why Weren’t Templates in 1.5?

Though we initially announced that the jquery-tmpl plugin would be part of jQuery Core in version 1.5, the plugin was, as it is today, still in the Beta 1 stage. Thus, when the time came last December to really evaluate new features for 1.5, it was not really considered ready for inclusion. Given what we’ve explained above, we hope it’s clear that we don’t plan to include templating directly in Core in the near future. The jQuery UI Templating plugin will be a standalone plugin with no dependencies on any other part of jQuery UI, and will become the only templating solution “officially” supported by the project, though jQuery will, of course, continue to work with any JavaScript templating engine that spits out good, old-fashioned strings of HTML.

Hotlinking to be disabled on January 31, 2011

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Lately, we have noticed a significant increase in traffic from sites that hotlink directly to files on our various properties (jquery.com, jqueryui.com, dev.jquery.com, etc.) instead of downloading and hosting them locally or taking advantage of the CDNs that we and others (Google, Microsoft, etc.) provide for this purpose. This behavior has started to negatively affect the performance of our network and is preventing legitimate users from accessing our site at peak times.

In order to improve the performance and availability of our sites for all users, we have disabled hotlinking to images across our entire network. We will be disabling hotlinking to all other types of content (such as CSS and JavaScript) at the end of January. If your site is hotlinking to jQuery domains other than code.jquery.com, please be aware that you must update your site before this deadline or it will stop functioning normally.

For information on upgrading your site to take advantage of one of the available CDNs, or to download jQuery to host on your own server, please visit:

Downloading jQuery
jQuery UI 1.8.7 Release Notes

Thank you for your cooperation!

jQuery Community Updates 10/26

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Updates From jQuery Core

I’ve got some good news today about the next version of jQuery: jQuery 1.4.4. On the heels of the 1.4.3 release, which included many fixes (and of course the introduction of jQuery Mobile), we felt it would be of most benefit to the community if we were to make a maintenance release soon after, aimed to further improve the stability of the jQuery core.

For 1.4.4, we’ve identified those bugs that were most critical for us to fix and thanks to John Resig and the bug triage team, we’ve already fixed the majority of these issues. We currently intend on releasing 1.4.4 in early November, assuming no further major bugs are targeted for this release.

Today, we would like to ask the community to assist us in ensuring this new release is as stable as possible through stress-testing it. While we already run a comprehensive suite of automated unit tests on jQuery, adding real-world user testing into our project flow allows us the opportunity to fix critical bugs sooner and will assist in 1.4.4 being a significant improvement over the last release.

If you would like to test 1.4.4, you can download an up-to-the-minute version of it (dubbed jQuery Git) here:

http://code.jquery.com/jquery-git.js

Please bear in mind that this version is not yet ready for production systems and is only made available for evaluation and testing. It is also now available on jsFiddle.net under the entry ‘jQuery 0 Git’.

We appreciate the community’s assistance in helping us make this release as stable as possible and welcome any feedback you may have on it. If you notice a bug in this release and would like to report it, please see the guidelines on bug submission.

Updates From the jQuery UI Team

The developers from the jQuery UI team stayed in Boston for three days after the conference and were able to fix quite a few bugs and do some face-to-face planning on the future of jQuery UI. jQuery UI 1.8.6 is nearing a release date very soon, so keep an eye on the jQuery UI blog for it.

Additionally, the jQuery UI team is working with Colin Snover to migrate jQuery UI’s ticket system over to a new system like jQuery Core just received. We are really excited about having a more stable and collaborative ticket tracking system and would love more contributions from the community helping in ticket triage. If you are interested in contributing, please talk to a jQuery Developer Relations team member.

The Official jQuery Podcast with Ralph Whitbeck and Rey Bango released their 37th episode last week. Their guest this week was Ben Nadel and they discussed jQuery in the ColdFusion community as well as talk about the jQuery Conference that took place in Boston last weekend. This week they’ll be interviewing John Resig about jQuery 1.4.3 and jQuery Mobile. If you have any questions you would like answered please send your question via the contact form.

Don’t forget about our forums. We have a vibrant community asking and answering questions. We would love more people contributing by helping others out in answering questions. It’s a great way to get involved in the project; being able to give your knowledge back to others is very rewarding.

jQuery Conference 2010: San Francisco Bay Area Announced

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Microsoft Silicon Valley Research CenterThe jQuery Project is very excited to announce the dates for our first-ever San Francisco Bay Area conference. The conference will be held at the Microsoft Silicon Valley Research Center in Mountain View, California on April 24th and 25th, 2010.

The San Francisco Bay Area conference is the second of four events planned by the jQuery Project in 2010. The first was the jQuery14 event, and additional conferences are being planned in Europe and on the East Coast for later this year.

This venue is the largest that the project has worked with to date (Harvard Law School in ‘07, the MIT Stata Center in ‘08 and Microsoft New England Research Center in ’09) and we expect to sell out very quickly.

Registration is currently scheduled to open on Wednesday, March 17th; tickets will be priced at $199. In addition to General Admission tickets, we’re offering a limited number of discounted student tickets priced at $99, with a valid student ID.

Watch the jQuery blog or jQuery Twitter feed for notification when registration opens.

A brief synopsis of some of the content that you’ll be able to expect:

  • jQuery
  • jQuery UI
  • jQuery Plugins
  • Complex Application Development
  • jQuery Case Studies

In addition to two days of jQuery sessions, for the first time we’ll be adding an additional day of jQuery training, prior to the main event. The training will be provided by appendTo and focused on helping you and your team get up to speed on jQuery prior to attending the conference. The training will cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to jQuery
  • Finding Something
  • Doing Something With It
  • Chaining
  • Introduction to jQuery UI
  • Implementing jQuery UI Widgets

The training will be held on April 23rd at the Microsoft San Francisco offices in downtown San Francisco; tickets will cost $299. All proceeds from training go to the jQuery Project.

Interested in speaking? Please fill out our call for speaking submissions form and watch the jQuery Blog for updates.

jQuery UI 1.7 Released: New domain, New CSS Framework & Dramatic Updates to Controls

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We’re excited to announce the release of jQuery UI v1.7, the newest version of jQuery’s effects and UI library. This release culminates many months of development in which a major overhaul of the whole library was performed and a new CSS framework introduced, all in order to provide a professional and easily extensible set of UI controls and effects for jQuery developers. The new CSS framework is especially exciting since it will not only allow for easy theming of jQuery UI controls but also allow plugin authors in general to take advantage of ThemeRoller, the dynamic theme generation application developed by the Filament Group for the jQuery UI project.

Full details of this new & exciting release can be found on the new jQuery UI blog.

Think You’re Good at CSS & Want a Free Pass SXSW? Check This Contest Out.

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jQuery UI sponsor Filament Group is holding an awesome contest:

“To celebrate ThemeRoller’s selection as a finalist for the SXSW Web Award for Technical Achievement, we’re holding a contest to give away one free pass to the SXSW Interactive Festival to the person who creates the coolest use of the new jQuery UI CSS framework.”

Check out the contest post here: Contest: Win a Free Pass to SXSW Interactive for the Coolest Use of the jQuery UI CSS Framework

Quoting Filament:

SXSW badge

We’re really excited about the new jQuery UI CSS framework because it makes it easy to theme UI widgets or even entire layouts with the jQuery UI ThemeRoller web application. To celebrate the nomination and encourage everyone to take advantage of this new framework, we’re holding a contest to see who can demonstrate the most creative use of the framework’s capabilities. The winner will receive a free pass to the SXSW Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas, March 13-17, 2009.

How to get started

First off, download a theme and demo page from jQuery UI ThemeRoller and review the jQuery UI CSS framework documentation to get an idea of how the framework is used. Then head over to the jQuery UI site and grab the handy Firefox ThemeRoller bookmarklet to help you test your styles as you build your project. If you’re creating a demo page, we strongly suggest that you include the Theme switcher dropdown to let people quickly sample ThemeRoller themes on your page and really show off the theming in action.

Remember, the CSS framework is not just for jQuery plugins — framework styles can be used with any Javascript library or your own custom markup. We’d be thrilled to see how far you can go with a cool WordPress template, corporate website, widget or even a game to show the power and flexibility of this system. Feel free to use multiple scoped, themes, too — go wild.

How to enter

We’re going to keep this simple: post a comment with a brief description of your project and a link to a functioning example. The winner will be decided by Filament Group based on the creativity, quality and inventiveness of their project.

Contest rules

  • Everyone is eligible, no exceptions.
  • You may submit any type of project that uses the jQuery UI CSS framework: public sites, demo pages or anything else that shows off your creativity and is publicly accessible (read: not behind a login).
  • You may enter as many unique projects as you wish; each will count as a separate entry. (Please don’t post the same one over and over…that may count against you).
  • The entry deadline is Wednesday, February 25, 2009 at midnight.
  • The contest winner will be announced on Friday, February 27, 2009.
  • The winner will receive a single pass to the SXSW Interactive Festival, which includes admission to the SXSW Web Awards ceremony on Sunday, March 15. We will email you an access code that will allow your to register for free. (NOTE: the pass does not provide entry to the Film or Music festivals, nor does it include transportation, room/board, or meals — you’ll need to cover those yourself.)
  • jQuery UI and Filament Group Inc. reserve the right to link to your project (we want to promote your hard work).

A little inspiration

To show off what is possible with the jQuery UI CSS framework, here is a really fantastic example of a plugin that uses the framework really well, from styles to icons. Nicolas Rudas created a very cool Apple-style file browser that also includes the theme switcher dropdown for good measure. He’s taken this a step further by creating a jQuery API browser that uses his plugin. Very cool indeed.

(NOTE: Nicolas Rudas was not notified prior to the announcement of this contest, so Nicolas, if you’d like to enter you’re still eligible to win. How’s that for competition?)

image

There is a list of plugins that use the CSS framework on the documentation wiki but it’s pretty short at the moment and we’re hoping that this contest really gets people fired up to try out the framework for themselves.

So…get to it, show us what you’ve got!

Check out the contest here: Contest: Win a Free Pass to SXSW Interactive for the Coolest Use of the jQuery UI CSS Framework

jQuery UI 1.7 is the new 1.6

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The jQuery UI team has been working for over 9 months on the 1.6 release and during this long process, we’ve deeply re-factored every plugin and introduced a very big shift in how we write markup and styles with the new jQuery UI CSS Framework. Also during that time, the jQuery core library released the new 1.3 version which incorporates a lot of improvements that we wanted to leverage.

We hear ya

We clearly have heard the confusion as these fairly large changes were made between release candidates in the 1.6 development cycle (post 1.6rc2). Based on feedback from the jQuery UI community, we want to address the confusion around compatibility between jQuery 1.2.6 and 1.3 and the jQuery UI library by creating two very distinct releases in the next few weeks:

1.6rc6 plus fixes will become 1.7 (compatible with jQuery 1.3+)

What we are currently calling jQuery UI 1.6rc6 is going to be released as jQuery UI 1.7. This code is built from the ground up to take full advantage of jQuery 1.3 and the new jQuery UI CSS Framework and is different enough to warrant a dot release. After a lot of analysis, we’ve decided that compatibility with both 1.2.6 and 1.3 is not feasible in a single UI release while still having a maintainable and lean codebase, so this version will not be compatible with jQuery 1.2.6 or earlier.

1.6rc2 plus fixes will become 1.6 (compatible with jQuery 1.2.6)

For all those folks still actively using jQuery 1.2.6, we want to provide a legacy release of the jQuery UI library based on 1.6rc2 that ports over as many bug fixes and improvements as possible from more recent code updates to provide a clear, stable foundation that will be fully compatible with jQuery 1.2.6. To avoid any confusion, this version will be called jQuery UI 1.6 final. Since this will be a legacy release, the team will not be actively developing this code once it is finalized. Also, this release will not contain any changes related to the new jQuery UI CSS Framework. It will have the same theming support as jQuery UI 1.5.3.

We understand that this is a fairly large change and welcome input from the community on how to make the upgrade as smooth as we possibly can. A complete upgrade guide will be posted shortly to guide you on a plugin-by-plugin basis to help ease the transition.

Current Release Status

We received a lot of great help testing the latest release candidate, 1.6rc6, and are fixing the final few issues, so that it can be released as soon as it’s ready. A current summary status of the release can always be found on the front page of our Dev and Planning wiki ( http://wiki.jqueryui.com/ ). We are very excited about the quality of this new jQuery UI release because it will serve as a solid foundation that will give us a stable API and let us release more frequently throughout the year with updates and new widgets.

Weekly releases coming

Starting in March we will switch to a weekly release mode. Each week we will alternate between pushing a stable bug fix release (1.7.1, 1.7.2, etc.) and a preview release (alpha, beta, rc) including new plugins and functionality. So each branch will receive an update at most every two weeks. If we need an additional release in-between or we need to add an extra beta or rc, we will do so on a week-to-week basis, adjusting the rest of the roadmap accordingly. Our goal is to work toward a 6-8 week release cycle (2-3 weeks alpha, 2-3 weeks beta, 1-2 weeks rc, then final).

Download builder update

We have pushed a complete update to the Download Builder. It is now fully integrated with ThemeRoller so that you can download a customized jQuery UI library zip including a pre-built or custom theme. We’ve also fixed up some issues that existed with downloading an invalid zip file in IE and also 1.5.3 minified files.

Thank you for your help and support

We want to thank the community for it’s support and encourage your participation in helping us to develop the best UI library on the planet. If you are a developer who is interested in helping us with bug fixing, please feel free to post a message on the ui-development group ( http://groups.google.com/group/jquery-ui-dev ) and ask how you can help out.