Foundation Board Update – Renewed Focus on Key Priorities

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In June, the jQuery Foundation Board of Directors held an in-person meeting, hosted by Famous in their San Francisco offices. During the meeting, the Board agreed to the following priorities to fulfill the Foundation’s Mission of improving the open web, making it accessible for everyone, through the development and support of open source software, and collaboration with the development community.

Our priorities are:

  1. Diversity: Open source depends on contributions. An organization’s vitality can be destroyed by having a closed group that excludes or even actively antagonizes newcomers. There is incredible value in having a diverse set of contributors with different cultures, backgrounds, perspectives, and skill sets. The jQuery Foundation is committed to improving diversity at all levels, from the development community in general to the projects we host and all the way to our own board, which we acknowledge isn’t very diverse today.
  2. Accessibility: As with diversity, this goal is again in the spirit of inclusiveness. Web technology has many features to make it friendly to users with sight, motor, or cognitive issues. Many web developers don’t know about them, or defeat them without realizing the implications. We want to change that. Last month’s jQuery SF conference had several excellent speakers who showed what the web can be like for some users: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWzEF1P-bvI#t=7h34m30s
  3. Education: This goal crosses all of our priorities and encompasses many different subjects. By educating developers, both on the world of open source and also on the issues of diversity and accessibility, we can make the web an inclusive place.

We will achieve these goals by focusing our efforts on three key areas:

  1. Actively Recruiting New Projects: As you can tell, the jQuery Foundation’s mission goes far beyond the original jQuery projects. We are looking to host projects that we can help. The Foundation offers projects greater visibility, a voice in the standards process, help in managing their community, infrastructure such as a CDN, and other benefits. Projects remain autonomous, the Foundation doesn’t dictate the project’s goals or roadmap. We can, however, offer financial support for meeting mutually agreed upon project goals.
  2. Defining and Delivering Essential (basic through advanced) Web Developer Education: We want to help developers learn how to contribute to open source projects, how to run open source projects, and how to build web sites or applications that apply best practices and beyond that, we want to educate developers on the importance and implementation of diversity and accessibility in their projects. Finally, we want to get the word out about how the jQuery Foundation can help developers do their jobs better.
  3. Growing Our Impact through Outreach: The jQuery Foundation can only accomplish its goals with the support of companies and individuals who believe in the mission. If you or your company is interested in joining us to improve the web development community, please get in touch [email protected]. Like the open source projects we host, the jQuery Foundation itself is powered by memberships, volunteers and donations! Those of you who have already contributed, we thank you for supporting the mission.

jQuery Foundation Project Updates

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In order to make it easier for jQuery Foundation Members and Web developers to quickly stay abreast of all our projects, we will periodically publish consolidated project updates here.

jQuery Core

Powering 2/3 of sites, jQuery is a fast, small, and feature-rich JavaScript library

Since last December’s release, the team has been hard at work on a major 3.0 release. This release – the alpha of which came out on July 8 – comes with many updates (including Promises/A+ compliant Deferreds) and bug fixes, and it finally removes some previously deprecated and underused features.

Links: download, meeting notes, full list of 3.0 changes

A big thank you to the core team and everyone who contributed – and will contribute – to the upcoming release.
Questions?  Contact Timmy Willison

globalize-mark-light (1) Globalize

JavaScript library for internationalization and localization that leverages the official Unicode CLDR JSON data.

Globalize version 1.0 was released in April and provides developers with localized number formatting and parsing, date and time formatting and parsing, relative time formatting, currency formatting, and message formatting (with pluralization and gender support) that runs in browsers and Node.js, consistently across all of them.

One exciting thing the community is focused on is the ability to compile Globalize for production. This will enable applications to generate custom runtime code that is extremely small and fast.

Links: git, mailing list,
Questions?  Contact Rafael Xavier de Souza

icn-jquerymobile-logo jQuery Mobile

Unified, HTML5-based user interface system for all popular mobile device platforms, built on the jQuery and jQuery UI foundation

The team has been heads down on version 1.5.0, which will bring numerous improvements including:

  • A new standalone enhancer module for customizable, fast declarative initialization of any javascript including jQuery widgets and plugins.
  • Improved and re-written shared with jQuery UI including button, checkboxradio, and controlgroup and the accordion widget which will replace the current collapsible and collapsible set widgets.
  • All of jQuery Mobile’s widget will now also feature the classes option for improved customizability and theming.
  • Re-written table and navbar widgets
  • Greatly improved modularity

Check out full release plans here

Links: download, meeting notes

Questions?  Contact Alexander Schmitz

Esprima

High performance, standard-compliant ECMAScript parser written in JavaScript

In March, we released Esprima 2.1.0, introducing support for several new pieces of ES6 syntax. In the mean time, a lot of work has been done to complete its ES6 support (check the roadmap). We’ve also improved the testing infrastructure and workflow to make the codebase more contributor-friendly.

Links: git, mailing list

A big thank you to all those who contributed patches to this release: Ariya Hidayat, Bei Zhang, Brandon Mills, Mike Rennie, Mike Sherov.

Questions?  Contact Ariya Hidayat

icn-ui-logo jQuery UI

Curated set of UI interactions, effects, widgets, and themes built on top of the jQuery Library.

The team released jQuery UI 1.11.4 in March, bringing bug fixes for Draggable, Resizable, Sortable, Accordion, Dialog, Slider, and Tooltip.

We are focused now on support for Pointer Events, and splitting up UI Core and old jQuery support to enable smaller builds

Links: git, meeting notes
Questions? Contact Scott González

ChassisChassis

Creating open standards for CSS libraries, JavaScript UI libraries, and web developers in general.

The team is working on its Phase One release which will involve an initial CSS Framework – this is planned for later this summer.

Work is also underway for a themeroller.

Links: git, meeting notes

Thanks to Micheal Arestad, Alexander Schmitz and Rohit Mulange

Questions?  Contact Sarah Frisk

qunitQUnit

Powerful, easy-to-use JavaScript unit testing framework

The latest release, 1.18.0, made a lot of improvements to the HTML reporter, making it more efficient to debug failures. For example, a new diff algorithm makes it easier to spot the difference in failed expected/actual assertions.

We’re currently working on the js-reporters project, which QUnit will implement, along with hopefully many other JavaScript testing frameworks and tools. The goal is to standardize an API with events and event data for test runners. A tool like Karma could then adopt a single interface instead of having to support each testing tool individually.

If you want to help moving QUnit along, check out these issues.

Links: git, meeting notes

Questions?  Contact Jörn Zaefferer

PEP

PointerEvents Polyfill: a unified event system for the web platform

PEP’s First release (0.3.0) came out in April and the the project is presently working to automate and improve the W3C test suite.

Links: git, meeting notes,

Questions?  Contact Scott González

Get Some Credit!

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Submit Your Project for the jQuery Foundation Web Excellence Program

How awesome is your project/site/integration/app? Probably really awesome, otherwise, you wouldn’t be doing it, right?!?

The jQuery Foundation wants to tell the world about all the incredible things developers are doing with jQuery Foundation projects. That’s why we are launching the jQuery Foundation Web Excellence program.

Here’s how it works:

  1. You pick the category or categories in which you want to submit (See category descriptions below)
  2. Tell us about you, your company/project, and how jQuery Foundation projects help you make it happen
  3. We’ll highlight projects on the jQuery Blog and promote them on social media

What are you waiting for? Get the the visibility you and your project deserve!  Go to the Web Excellence Submission Form and submit your project today!

Category Descriptions

  • All Around Rock Star: This category highlights the sites/apps that leverage any jQuery Foundation project to produce a stellar digital experience. Please highlight your approach to leveraging jQuery Foundation tools, libraries and resources, stand-alone or in combination with other Open Web components and frameworks to solve real problems and delight users.
  • Mobile Masterpiece: This category highlights the sites/apps that use any jQuery Foundation project to engage consistently with users across all devices, including mobile.
  • Enterprise: Highlights the organizations leveraging any jQuery Foundation project to help their enterprise organization (5,000 and up employees) achieve strategic IT and/or business objectives (e.g. system integration, uptime, compatibility/accessibility, revenue, cost reduction).
  • Top Speed: Highlights the organizations that use any jQuery Foundation project as part of a rapid project/product launch and/or to achieve fast site/app performance.  Do your users have a need for speed that jQuery Foundation projects help you deliver? Tell us about it!
  • Globetrotter: Showcases the sites, apps, systems or projects that best demonstrate the power of Globalize when implemented stand-alone or in combination with other jQuery Foundation projects.
  • Powered by jQuery: Showcases the SDKs and other toolsets that leverage any jQuery Foundation project as a dependency.

Rules & Terms:

  • There is no fee to enter
  • Only English language submissions will be accepted
  • Your entry must be submitted using the Submission Form
  • Please provide box/drive links to all graphics/visuals in your text answers, so the desired placement is clear
  • You may submit for multiple categories, but please make individual submissions for each desired category
  • The jQuery Foundation reserves the right to change or cancel a category at any time
  • A selection of submitted entries will be publicly displayed on the jQuery Foundation web site and promoted via our social media channels
  • Submitting an entry gives the jQuery Foundation the permission and approval to leverage submitted content for Marketing and Public Relations purposes

jQuery Foundation 2014 Annual Report

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The jQuery Foundation exists to support web developers in creating web content built on open standards that is accessible to all users. We accomplish this through the development and support of open source software, and collaboration with the development community. The Foundation houses open source projects that are essential to this vision.

What we’ve accomplished

We’ve always been known for our namesake projects and their excellent documentation. In the past year, the jQuery Foundation has continued its quest to ensure that web developers have the tools and information they need to get their jobs done, beyond just jQuery, jQuery UI, and jQuery Mobile.

The past few months in particular have been incredibly productive. In October, we adopted the jQuery Mousewheel plugin. In December, Google transferred ownership of the Pointer Events Polyfill (PEP) to the jQuery Foundation. Finally, in January, we announced adoption of the Esprima project, a JavaScript parser that is used by dozens of developer tools. We’re working to foster the continued development of all of these projects, and welcome contributions from the community.

In 2014 we started work on the Chassis project to create an open standard for CSS libraries. We’ve had discussions with developers from Topcoat, Zurb Foundation, Filament Group, Cardinal, Famo.us, Yandex, WordPress, Automattic, 10up, 960grid, Unsemantic, jQuery Mobile, jQuery UI, Intel App Framework, Cascade CSS, Portland Webworks, Adobe, Hulu, and Bootstrap. We’re looking for additional contributors and input from the community about what you want in a CSS framework.

Our year by the numbers

Today, the jQuery Foundation hosts 45 open source repositories at GitHub. These include both code and documentation.

If you need evidence that jQuery Foundation projects are used everywhere, look no further than our Content Delivery Network (CDN) powered by MaxCDN. The 290 billion requests in 2014 transferred nearly 11 petabytes of data. That, of course, does not include the requests for locally hosted copies of jQuery and to other CDNs such as Google, Microsoft, or CDNJS. No doubt the overall number of requests is in the trillions.

Even the best code project can be unusable without good documentation. Web developers don’t just tell us our documentation is good, they tell us that it’s excellent. There were 149 million page views of jQuery Foundation documentation in 2014, coming from 230 countries. All of our documentation sites are available on GitHub so that developers can open issues and make pull requests to improve them. Open source isn’t just for code, it works equally well for documentation!

The jQuery Foundation also hosted, licensed, and participated in 10 events around the world during the past year, including jQuery Conferences in San Diego, Chicago, Vienna Austria, Toronto Canada, and Oxford England. These events always include a wide variety of subjects, and are not just about projects hosted by the jQuery Foundation. The common thread in all the conferences is that they cover topics that web developers should learn in order to do their jobs well.

Future plans

This year we will continue to drive standards forward based on the needs of web developers. Our participation in groups such as EcmaScript TC39 and the W3C has given web developers a say in this process that, until recently, was primarily controlled by large for-profit companies and browser makers. We also plan to increase our participation in the Unicode Consortium as we ramp up our investment in Globalize, so that developers can easily make their software usable worldwide.

Our recent adoption of Esprima highlights another area where web developers could use some more help: development tools. The tools landscape for processing JavaScript, CSS, and HTML is incredibly fragmented. There are multiple processes for authoring, creating, modularizing, and consuming JavaScript, none of which have established themselves as a standard. There are more than a dozen package managers, each with its own unique set of advantages and drawbacks. We’d like to work with developers to settle on a smaller set of options that impose fewer burdens on both the producers and consumers of JavaScript libraries.

2014 Financial Information

Thanks to generous contributions from members and sponsors, we were able to fund a variety of activities that gave back to the cause of open source. The majority of our investments were dedicated to fostering development of jQuery Foundation projects and furthering the use of those projects through events and educational opportunities.

2014 Revenue Chart2014 Expenses Chart

Acknowledgments

We’re proud of the accomplishments of the jQuery Foundation, all of which were realized by the continuing hard work of our team members. Many thanks also to the web developers who take the time to report issues, fix documentation, or contribute code patches. By improving jQuery Foundation projects, you’ve improved web development for everyone.

We’re also grateful for our jQuery Foundation members and their support. In the past year, companies such as IBM and Famo.us have joined and provided resources that allow us to accomplish our mission. Let’s all go out and do even more in 2015!

Esprima 2.0 Released

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Last week, the jQuery Foundation announced our adoption of the Esprima project, the widely used JavaScript parser that powers many code analysis tools. Today we’re pleased to announce the release of version 2.0, now available on npm.

Up until now, the official releases of Esprima have only parsed ECMAScript 5 standard syntax. However, the experimental “harmony” branch has been adding ECMAScript 2015 (also popularly known as ES6) features for quite some time. A lot of the work there has been driven by Facebook. Now that the syntax for many ES6 features has stabilized and even shipped on some browsers, there is a need for tools that support the new syntax.

Esprima 2.0 introduces many stable ES6 features brought from the harmony branch, where they’ve been pretty reliable. This new baseline for Esprima makes it possible for tools such as code coverage analysis, style checkers, and linters to start to process the new ES6 syntax.

Since ES5 is likely to be with us for quite a while longer, Esprima 1.x will continue to be maintained for now in order to provide ES5-only parsing. Tools that currently use Esprima 1.x can continue to do so until they are ready and able to process ES6 constructs.

The 2.1 release of Esprima should follow relatively quickly, based on feedback on the stability of the 2.0 release. That means the Esprima team needs feedback from the makers of Esprima-based tools to know whether there are any problems. If you have built an Esprima-based tool and have problems with this release, please report them. (Note that the project is now using GitHub for issues rather than Google Code.)

We’re excited to see where Esprima goes next!

jQuery Foundation adopts Esprima

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The jQuery Foundation is excited to announce that we are now hosting the Esprima project! The Abstract Syntax Tree generated by this JavaScript parser is used by many important developer tools such as ESLint, Istanbul, JSDoc and JSCS.

Ariya Hidayat has decided to transfer ownership of the Esprima project and its repo to the jQuery Foundation. We’re glad that Ariya has taken this step, since Esprima is such an important part of so many projects and is downloaded more than 2.5 million times every month from npm. Many thanks to Ariya for entrusting this project to us.

The adoption of the Esprima project, following the recent adoption of the Pointer Events polyfill, are the initial steps in a big shift toward realizing our mission to improve the open web and make it accessible to everyone. The jQuery Foundation looks to ensure that other important tools and emerging standards are also given the chance to grow and shape the open web.

The jQuery Foundation is committed to providing support to Esprima and opening it up for contributions. If you’ve been a contributor to this project already, we want you to continue that work and are always open to new contributors. Please stay tuned, we’ll be making more announcements soon.

Improving the Pointer Events Polyfill

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Today, we’re excited to announce that Google has transferred its Pointer Events polyfill to the jQuery Foundation. This polyfill was originally written by Google’s Polymer team but since Google has chosen to put their Pointer Event implementation on hold, we engaged to ensure that the polyfill is maintained and continues to be a tool developers can use as a path to the eventual native implementation in all browsers. Many thanks to Google and the Polymer Team for allowing us to build off their work and continue development.

The jQuery Foundation has been, and continues to be a strong proponent of standards and we are specifically strong proponents of the Pointer Events standard because it will simplify the way web developers handle user interactions. Today developers are saddled with two very different event models for mouse and touch, even though they share many similarities. The result is often code that has a myriad of special cases, particularly when the device itself generates “fake” mouse events from touches. The jQuery Foundation hopes to drive developer adoption of this unified event system. Our goal is to have all browsers implement this standard natively.

Just yesterday, the W3C took the Pointer Events specification to the Proposed Recommendation stage. This makes Pointer Events one step closer to a finished standard and gives browsers a solid base on which to implement these APIs. Some browsers have even begun their implementation. Unsurprisingly Internet Explorer, where the first implementation of Pointer Events began before being submitted to the W3C for standardization, has implemented Pointer Events and Firefox has a branch of their code base implementing Pointer Events which they intend to port to all version of Firefox. Both of these implementations recently passed 100% of the Pointer Events test suite so implementation is progressing nicely.

We want to thank Microsoft Open Technologies for their hard work on Pointer Events and their continued support. We also want to thank IBM, Mozilla, Google, Dojo and the many other organizations and individuals that have helped and continue to help make developers lives easier through the creation, fostering and promotion of new standards like Pointer Events. If you want to get involved or just want to start using Pointer Events in your projects, head over to the new Pointer Events repo and check it out.

The (Not Just) jQuery Foundation

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The jQuery Foundation’s mission has always been about more than just our namesake projects of jQuery, jQuery UI, and jQuery Mobile. We already host several projects such as Sizzle, QUnit and Globalize that are not dependent on the jQuery library.

This wider web-oriented mission is evident in our jQuery Conferences, which span a wide range of developer concerns beyond jQuery, including Node, CSS, tooling, testing and much more. Over the years we’ve had talks on build tools, accessibility, security, performance, design patterns, and frameworks such as Ember and Angular. At our San Diego conference this past February, for example, Lenny Markus gave a great talk on PayPal’s continuing adoption of Node as they move away from Java and proprietary solutions, Catherine Farman talked about real world responsive design, and John Dimm gave a talk on the HTML5 speech APIs.

The jQuery Foundation is participating in the continuing evolution of the web platform via our memberships in both the W3C and ECMA TC39 (The group standardizing what we know as JavaScript). We feel that it’s essential to have strong representation in those standards groups to ensure they meet the needs of developers. The Foundation provides a platform for developers to have a voice in these standards bodies.

Beyond the technical compatibility between our projects, we also share the open source model and all the benefits it provides. The Foundation adds the benefit of a top-level structure designed to serve the projects, providing the resources they need but letting the contributors decide the best direction for the project based on community input. Any project that joins the Foundation is given the ability to serve their community’s needs rather than be constrained by the goals of a for-profit company.

Though this has been our mission for a long time, we felt we needed to make this clearer. We are excited to start bringing this part of our mission into the light and start actively working toward a more open web accessible to everyone. If you are excited as well, please help us. Contribute your time to Foundation projects. Offer your company’s services. If you or your company have an established open source project that you believe could benefit everyone and flourish by becoming part of the jQuery Foundation, check out our philosophy around projects joining the Foundation and let us know you’re interested. If you would rather just support the existing and future projects of the Foundation through financial support, become a member of the Foundation. Open source projects will only thrive if everyone who benefits from them contributes back in whatever way they can.

jQuery’s Content Delivery Network: You Got Served!

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MaxCDNIn 2013, MaxCDN joined the jQuery Foundation and stepped up to provide Content Delivery Network (CDN) services for the jQuery CDN at code.jquery.com. Files can now be requested through both HTTP and HTTPS (SSL) protocols, either to download to your own servers or to use directly on production web sites. MaxCDN’s infrastructure can reliably deliver jQuery files through a worldwide high-speed collection of servers to minimize round-trip time.

Why a CDN is Useful to Developers

The obvious benefit is that the MaxCDN network is much faster than the average server, and geographically distributed so that round-trip times are kept low. Yet there is another subtle benefit. Many web sites simply serve up all their content (HTML, CSS, scripts, images, and other assets) from the same domain. This can create a bottleneck on both the browser and the server. Downloading content from multiple domains, known as domain sharding, can improve performance. Just remember that as with any good thing, going overboard is a bad idea. Some research shows that just two domains may be the sweet spot. Use a tool like WebPageTest to test your site to get the best results.

Why a CDN is Useful to jQuery Projects

jQuery projects serve out a huge number of bytes, especially on days when a project makes a new release. When developers rush to download the latest version, we want to be able to handle the load. GitHub does a great job of supporting our development cycle and working project files, but it is not designed to serve up billions of copies of our production files. Google and Microsoft also provide CDNs, but it can take several days between the time a project makes a release and the time the files appear on those CDNs. Third-party CDNs also have their own rules about which files can be placed on the CDN, for example they don’t post pre-release versions. The jQuery CDN allows us full control over timing and content.

Serving Billions of Files, Trillions of Bytes

We thought we were serving a lot of files, but some statistics from MaxCDN really drive home the point. In the last five months of 2013, the CDN served more than 82 billion files, exceeding 3.6 petabytes. We sent out enough bytes to completely fill 3,269 1-terabyte disk drives! An average day on the CDN has us serving up about 20 terabytes of data.

Here are the ten most popular files requested from the CDN:

# File name Hits
(billion)
Size
(terabytes)
1 jquery-latest.js 6.36 404.65
2 jquery-1.9.1.min.js 5.93 193.96
3 jquery-1.7.2.min.js 4.95 154.50
4 jquery-latest.min.js 4.45 116.08
5 /ui/1.10.3/jquery-ui.js 4.18 484.58
6 jquery-1.9.1.js 2.45 178.54
7 jquery-1.10.1.min.js 2.27 71.62
8 jquery-1.7.1.min.js 2.26 78.05
9 jquery-1.4.2.min.js 2.07 39.80
10 /ui/1.10.3/themes/smoothness/jquery-ui.css 1.55 9.83

There are some encouraging signs here. Some of the most popular files are the minified files, as they should be for a production web site. It’s also encouraging that recent versions of jQuery Core (1.9.1 and 1.10.1) are high up on the list. That means a lot of jQuery developers are keeping up with the features and bug fixes we’ve been adding.

The most commonly requested file is jquery-latest.js, which automatically updates whenever the jQuery Core team releases a new version. Developers should never use jquery-latest.js or jquery-latest.min.js on a production site, it is primarily meant for testing. Similarly, the full jQuery UI build at position 5 is the latest version, but that file may not be a good fit for production sites needing only a few jQuery UI widgets. A minified copy with just the needed widgets can be built on the download builder page.

Counting on the CDN

Thanks to MaxCDN’s contribution, the jQuery Foundation has a content delivery network that offers reliable high-speed access to all of our project files. The files at code.jquery.com serve as the official repository for all jQuery project releases. You can either download the file for local use, or reference our domain directly from your own web pages to take advantage of the CDN and domain sharding.

The State of jQuery 2014

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The year 2013 was an incredibly exciting one for jQuery. As jQuery celebrates eight years of supporting web developers, it’s time for our annual review. I’m pleased to say that we achieved a lot in 2013 and have some great plans for 2014!

New Leadership

In November, Kris Borchers became Executive Director of the jQuery Foundation as successor to Richard Worth. Kris has been a jQuery Foundation board member and a long-time jQuery contributor, so he understands the mission of the Foundation well. We welcome Kris, and thank Richard for his work in shepherding the Foundation through its first full year of existence.

jQuery used by 68% of the top 100k sites

Continuing Growth

It seems impossible to believe there are still web sites that don’t use jQuery, but the statistics at builtwith.com show there are fewer and fewer of them. jQuery’s core library is used by more than 61 percent of the top 100,000 sites, up 10 percent from last year. Growth is also strong in other jQuery Foundation projects such as jQuery UI, which is now used by nearly one-fifth of top-10,000 web sites.

New Environments

jQuery is also used in a lot of places that can’t be identified through a web crawl. You’ll find jQuery anywhere web technologies are used, not just the public Internet. That includes Google Chrome add-ons, Mozilla XUL apps and Firefox extensions, Firefox OS apps, Chrome OS apps, Windows 8 Store apps, BlackBerry 10 WebWorks apps, PhoneGap/Cordova apps, Node.js, and even the Sony PlayStation 4. By supporting these technologies, we’ve made it possible to take advantage of jQuery knowledge in many places other than just browsers and web pages.

Future-Oriented

In January 2013, we released jQuery 1.9; then jQuery 2.0 was released in April. These two versions dumped old APIs that were making jQuery bigger, slower, and harder to use. jQuery 2.0 went a step further and dropped support for environments that don’t support newer standards, such as Internet Explorer before version 9. From an API standpoint, the two behave identically, though; web developers can update to the 2.x branch whenever those older versions of IE are no longer important to their web pages or apps.

Backwards-Compatible

We knew that removing some old functionality from jQuery core could make migration slow and difficult; after all, a lot of code on web sites was written years ago and the people who wrote it are long gone. That’s why we created the jQuery Migrate plugin to identify code that was using the features we removed. Better than that, it allowed most of that old code to continue to work by shimming in the old behavior. It’s a great tool for keeping a site running while things are being updated, although we don’t advise using it for a long-term fix.

jQuery Served Your Way

With jQuery being used in so many environments, we want to make sure it fits with their workflows and conventions. So, we’re adapting by making jQuery available on both the npm and Bower package managers. This makes it easy for just about any JavaScript-based project to keep jQuery dependencies up to date. Last year’s refactor of jQuery core into small modules also lets developers create a custom build that removes features a project doesn’t need, to reduce the download size.

Keeping it Simple

We haven’t forgotten, however, that most developers keep things simple and just include a copy of the standard jQuery build using a <script> tag. So in 2013 we upgraded our content delivery network (CDN) thanks to a generous donation from MaxCDN. The jQuery CDN is now better than ever and supports the https protocol for delivering all files.

Advocating for Developer Needs

jQuery’s use of a convenient and browser-independent layer around the cumbersome DOM interfaces is one reason for its popularity. As Simon St. Laurent put it, “jQuery is how the web routes around broken API design.” But we don’t want the DOM API repair business to be our full-time line of work. People should be continuing to use jQuery because it’s a powerful way to implement designs and provides a vibrant ecosystem of useful plugins, not because the native DOM APIs are broken, verbose, or inconsistent. That’s why we participate in the standards process through bodies such as the W3C and ECMA.

Let’s Keep Innovating!

Over the next few days, posts on this blog will be counting the ways that the jQuery Foundation is improving the web developer community, in keeping with our mission. If you see something that interests you, we invite you to get in touch with us and participate!

Dave Methvin
President, jQuery Foundation