Update on jQuery.com Compromises

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Today at 11:15AM EDT, the jQuery Infrastructure team received widespread reports and confirmed a compromise of jquery.com. This attack was aimed at defacing our sites, and did not inject malware like the attack that was reported on September 18th by RiskIQ. We believe that these are separate incidents that may have used the same attack vector.

We took the site down as soon as we realized there was a compromise and cleaned the infected files. We are taking steps to re-secure our servers, upgrade dependencies, and address vulnerabilities.

At no point today have there been reports of malware being distributed from any of our sites, nor has the code of any jQuery libraries on our website or CDN been affected or modified today or during last week’s reported attack. Some of this confusion stems from last week’s attackers having set up a domain name intended to dupe users into thinking it was the official jQuery CDN. Please note that the official domain for jQuery files hosted from our official CDN is code.jquery.com.

There has also been concern that the user accounts of developers and administrators who use jquery.com and the rest of our WordPress sites have somehow been compromised by this attack. However, the only people who have a user account for the WordPress sites affected by these attacks are members of the jQuery team; we do not have any public user registration for any sort of account on any of the affected sites.

We are continuing to actively work on and monitor this situation and will update you as we learn more.


We have moved http://jquery.com to a new server only running code we trust and are continuing to monitor the situation closely. – September 24, 2014 at 5:07 PM EDT via Twitter

Was jquery.com Compromised?

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Lastest update on the compromise: Update on jQuery.com Compromises

Earlier today, RiskIQ published a blog post stating that the jQuery.com web servers were compromised and serving the RIG exploit kit for a short period of time on the afternoon of September 18th. Our internal investigation into our servers and logs have not yet found the RIG exploit kit or evidence that there was in fact a compromise.

RiskIQ was able to make contact with the jQuery Infrastructure team on September 18th, at which point with members of the RiskIQ team tried to find evidence of compromise. So far the investigation has been unable to reproduce or confirm that our servers were compromised. We have not been notified by any other security firm or users of jquery.com confirming a compromise. Normally, when we have issues with jQuery infrastructure, we hear reports within minutes on Twitter, via IRC, etc.

At no time have the hosted jQuery libraries been compromised.

Currently the only potential system compromised is the web software or server that runs jquery.com. We have asked RiskIQ to help us look through our server logs and systems to help identify when and how a compromise happened. Please check this blog post for updates on the situation.

Even though we don’t have immediate evidence of compromise, we have taken the proper precautions to ensure our servers are secure and clean. If you happened to visit any of the our sites on September 18th and are afraid of your system being compromised you can follow the advice RiskIQ recommends:

  • Immediately re-image system
  • Reset passwords for user accounts that have been used on the system
  • See if any suspicious activity has originated from the offending system