jQuery 1.4.2 Released

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jQuery 1.4.2 is now out! This is the second minor release on top of jQuery 1.4, fixing some outstanding bugs from the 1.4 release and landing some nice improvements.

I would like to thank the following people that provided patches for this release: Ben Alman, Justin Meyer, Neeraj Singh, and Noah Sloan.

Downloading

As usual, we provide two copies of jQuery, one minified (we now use the Google Closure Compiler as the default minifier) and one uncompressed (for debugging or reading).

You can feel free to include the above URLs directly into your site and you will get the full performance benefits of a quickly-loading jQuery.

Additionally you can also load the URLs directly from either Google or Microsoft’s CDNs:

New Features

A full list of the API changes can be found in the 1.4.2 category on the jQuery API site.

In this release we’ve added two new methods: .delegate() and .undelegate(). These methods serve as complements to the existing .live() and .die() methods in jQuery. They simplify the process of watching for specific events from a certain root within the document.

For example:

$("table").delegate("td", "hover", function(){
	$(this).toggleClass("hover");
});

This is equivalent to the following code written using .live():

$("table").each(function(){
	$("td", this).live("hover", function(){
		$(this).toggleClass("hover");
	});
});

Additionally, .live() is roughly equivalent to the following .delegate() code.

$(document).delegate("td", "hover", function(){
	$(this).toggleClass("hover");
});

What’s Changed?

There has been some large code rewrites within this release, both for performance and for fixing long-standing issues.

Performance Improvements

As is the case with virtually every release of jQuery: We’ve worked hard to continue to improve the performance of the code base, making sure that you’re provided with the best performing JavaScript code possible.

According to the numbers presented by the Taskspeed benchmark we’ve improved the performance of jQuery about 2x compared to jQuery 1.4.1 and about 3x compared to jQuery 1.3.2.

jQuery Taskspeed Results (Feb 14, 2010)

Specifically we’ve improved the performance of 4 areas within jQuery:

While comprehensive benchmarks like Taskspeed can be interesting if deconstructed into individual sub-tests for further study, as a project we tend to stay away from using them as an accurate measure of true, overall, library performance. Considering how many aspects make up a library, not to mention the different techniques that they offer, cumulative results rarely reflect how an actual user may use a library.

For example, we saw significant overall performance speed-ups in Taskspeed simply by optimizing the $("body") selector because it’s called hundreds of times within the tests. Additionally we saw large gains by optimizing .bind() and .unbind() by a fraction of a millisecond – an inconsequential amount – especially considering that any cases where you would bind hundreds of events you would likely want to use .live() or .delegate() instead.

We’ve collected some results from the other major libraries as well but are less interested in those results and far more interested in the performance improvements that we’ve made relative to older versions of jQuery itself.

We will continue to work on optimizing the jQuery code base – indefinitely. It’s always a major concern for us to try and provide the fastest JavaScript/DOM-development experience possible. And yes, there will likely always be ways to gain additional performance – either through internal optimizations or by pushing critical functionality off into browser-land for standardization.

Event Rewrite

The largest internal changes have come through a much-needed structural rewrite of the events module. Many quirky issues related to event binding have been resolved with these fixes.

Namely event handlers are no longer stored as object properties in jQuery’s internal object store (with metadata attached to the handlers). Instead they’re now stored within an internal array of objects.

If you’ve ever had the opportunity to play around with .data("events") on a jQuery element you would find that it returns an object with all the event types currently bound, within it.

To enumerate some of the changes that have occurred during this rewrite:

  • It’s now possible to bind identical handlers with different data, namespaces, and event types universally.
  • Execution of event handlers will continue after one handler removes itself (or its sibling handlers).
  • We no longer attach data/namespace information directly to the event handlers (only a unique tracking ID).
  • We no longer use proxy functions, internally, to try and encapsulate handlers.
  • Execution order of events is now guaranteed in all browsers. Google Chrome had a long-standing error in their object-looping logic that has been routed around.

As a side-effect of these changes we had to change the newly-exposed special add/special remove APIs in order to accommodate the new event data objects. Ben Alman is in the process of writing up a large tutorial on jQuery’s special event system and we will be making additional announcements when that occurs.

Bug Fixes

There were a total of 40 tickets closed in this minor release. Some relating to differences between jQuery 1.3.2 and jQuery 1.4.x, some fixing long-standing issues (like in the case of the event module rewrite).

Raw Data

This is the raw data that we collected to generate the aforementioned charts.

	jQuery 1.3.2	jQuery 1.4.1	jQuery 1.4.2	Prototype 1.6.1	MooTools 1.2.4	Dojo 1.4.1	YUI 3.0.0
FF 3.5	2182	806	 565	 2156	 1073	 575	 1885
FF 3.6	1352	677	 519	 2067	 857	 750	 1494
Opera	983	697	 222	 793	 678	 218	 1201
Safari	610	435	 252	 315	 235	 238	 612
Chrome	1591	703	 293	 271	 312	 222	 745
IE 8	2470	1937	 1141	 3045	 4749	 1420	 2922
IE 7	4468	3470	 1705	 9863	 10034	 1737	 5830
IE 6	6517	4468	 2110	 13499	 11453	 2202	 7295

14 Days of jQuery and the New API Browser

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It’s the start of a new year, and the jQuery team’s been hard at work. We’ve been up day and night working to crank out the upcoming jQuery 1.4 release, and there’s a LOT to announce! So much, in fact, that we’ll need fourteen full days to get it all out there… As such, I’d like to announce The 14 Days of jQuery 1.4!

The New jQuery 1.4 Site

Beginning on January 14th, we’ll start a fourteen-day event. Each day we’ll have fresh videos and announcements — there’ll be code releases, project-related updates, and jQuery UI goodness, among other things. In addition to the announcements, we’ll also be releasing a set of videos over the 14 days with talks and tutorials relating the jQuery 1.4 release and other general jQuery topics. You’ll want to check back at jQuery14.com every day during the two weeks to see what’s new, or sign up to be notified via email. Think of it like an online conference, only longer, freer, and with a bit of mystery and suspense!

But Wait, There’s More!

We’ve got a lot planned for January 14th, but it seemed good to whet your appetite and pre-release some tasty jQuery morsels. Head over to jQuery14.com to learn all about the brand-new jQuery API site:

Be sure to subscribe to the jQuery14.com site or to the @jquery Twitter account for all the updates during these upcoming weeks.

Free Books, Anyone?

The jQuery project is a non-profit, open-source effort, and we rely heavily on donations and contributions to help fund everything we do. We’ll be running a fundraising drive starting now and throughout the 14 Days of jQuery. If you’re a jQuery user, show your support by making a tax-deductible donation of $20 USD or more to the project during the event, and you’ll receive a free jQuery book with your donation.

It’s always important to mention that much of this would not be possible without the help of the jQuery project sponsors; Netflix, JupiterIT Consulting, appendTo, Fusionary Media and Oxide Design Co have all signed on as official sponsors of the 14 Days of jQuery 1.4, along with our favorite jQuery book publishers, Manning, Packt, jQuery Enlightenment, and O’Reilly.

That’s it for now — head on over to jQuery14.com for much more to come!

jQuery 1.4 Alpha 2 Released

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jQuery 1.4 Alpha 2 is released! This is the second alpha release of jQuery 1.4 (alpha 1 was released previously). The code is stable (passing all tests in all browsers we support), feature-complete (we’re no longer accepting new features for the release), and needs to be tested in live applications.

Grab the code:

NOTE: If you’re using jQuery 1.4a2 and you run into an error please make sure that you’re using the regular version of the code, it’ll make it easier to spot where the error is occurring.

How can I help?

To start, try dropping the above un-minified version of jQuery 1.4a2 into a live application that you’re running. If you hit an exception or some weirdness occurs immediately login to the bug tracker and file a bug. Be sure to mention that you hit the bug in jQuery 1.4a2!

We’ll be closely monitoring the bug reports that come in and will work hard to fix any inconsistencies between jQuery 1.3.2 and jQuery 1.4.

With your input we should be able to produce a solid release. Right now we’re looking to push out at least one beta around the beginning of the new year and a final release candidate early in January. The final release will occur on January 14th, coinciding with jQuery’s 4th birthday. Thanks for your help in reviewing jQuery 1.4a2!

jQuery 1.4 Alpha 1 Released

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Hot off the presses: jQuery 1.4 Alpha 1 is released! This is the first alpha release of jQuery 1.4. The code is stable (passing all tests in all browsers we support), feature-complete (we’re no longer accepting new features for the release), and needs to be tested in live applications.

Grab the code:

NOTE: If you’re using jQuery 1.4a1 and you run into an error please make sure that you’re using the regular version of the code, it’ll make it easier to spot where the error is occurring.

How can I help?

To start, try dropping the above un-minified version of jQuery 1.4a1 into a live application that you’re running. If you hit an exception or some weirdness occurs immediately login to the bug tracker and file a bug. Be sure to mention that you hit the bug in jQuery 1.4a1!

We’ll be closely monitoring the bug reports that come in and will work hard to fix any inconsistencies between jQuery 1.3.2 and jQuery 1.4.

What to Watch For

There are a few areas in jQuery that have seen extensive changes since 1.3.2 was released:

  • live was drastically overhauled and now supports submit, change, mouseenter, mouseleave, focus, and blur events in all browsers. Also now supports context and data.
  • append, prepend, etc. have been heavily optimized.
  • add has been adjusted to always return elements in document order.
  • find, empty, remove, addClass, removeClass, hasClass, attr, and css have been heavily optimized.

Full details concerning the release are forthcoming – for now we just need your help in catch regressions. Some more details can be found in John Resig’s keynote at the 2009 jQuery Conference.

Note: There are still a few open bugs that we will be reviewing before jQuery 1.4 final is released.

With your input we should be able to produce a solid release. Right now we’re looking to push out at least one more alpha before the holiday season and a final release candidate early in January. Thanks for your help in reviewing jQuery 1.4a1!

jQuery Summit – Nov. 19th

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jQuery Summit

Environments for Humans is running a one-day, online conference focusing on jQuery. The conference will be on November 19th and will feature a number of prominent members of the jQuery community, including members of the jQuery team.

The following talks are slated for the jQuery Summit:

  • The State of jQuery – John Resig
  • Web Interface Essentials – Marc Grabanski
  • RIAs: Building for the Desktop with the Web – Jonathan Snook
  • Rich Interactivity, Simplified, with jQuery UI – Richard Worth
  • Refactoring jQuery – Jonathan Sharp
  • JavaScript for Designers – David McFarland
  • Building Robust jQuery Plugins – Jörn Zaefferer
  • jQuery Anti-Patterns for Performance & Compression – Paul Irish

While a number of these talks are reprisals from the recent jQuery conference, this event is not being run by the jQuery project. That being said, it looks like it’s going to be a lot of fun, and we encourage those that missed the conference in September to check it out.

All attendees will be receiving a free copy of the upcoming jQuery Cookbook, from O’Reilly. Additionally a number of prizes will be given away to attendees (books, DVDs, etc.).

Register for the jQuery Summit

There is a ticket discount in effect until October 30th. Additionally, if you register and use the discount code JQRYRESIGJ you’ll save an extra 10% off the overall price. A portion of the proceeds will be coming back to help fund the project.

Fall 2009 jQuery Talks

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Reminder: While the upcoming jQuery Conference is already sold out, we’re still looking for some excellent talks. We’re accepting talk proposals until the 15th. If your talk is accepted your ticket fee will be waived.

Even if you can’t make the jQuery Conference, though, there are a number of opportunities to meet members of the jQuery team, hear talks about jQuery, or generally mingle with other jQuery users coming up in the next couple months. If you happen to know of any other talks or events please comment below and we’ll add them.